Archivi tag: russian invasion

THE GENERAL OF NAUR – MEMORIES OF APTI BATALOV (Part II)

The first meeting with Maskhadov

My first meeting with Aslan Maskhadov, Chief of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Chechen Republic took place a few days after my appointment. That day I was summoned to Grozny for a meeting of the commanders of the military units. When I arrived in Grozny, I introduced myself to his office, which if I remember correctly was on the second floor of the building that housed the Headquarters. After a short wait I was called by one of his guards and invited to enter. Maskhadov’s office, then still a Colonel, was not large. He was sitting on his desk and writing. I greeted him with the usual Chechen greeting, he got up from his chair and replied with a counter greeting. When he had finished, he looked at me and asked me what the purpose of my visit was.

I introduced myself, and Merzhuyev ‘s order regarding my appointment as Commander of the districts of Naursk and Nadterechny was placed on the table. Maskhadov took the document, read it, crossed out a sentence with his pen and said to me: Have it wright again, I don’t have enough cops. And he gave me back my order. I took the paper and looked at what he had erased. After seeing his correction the blood went to my head, my face started to burn with anger. Maskhadov had ticked “Police Captain”. Holding back the indignation with difficulty, I replied: I did not ask for this position, I will not go to anyone and I will not write anything! To be honest, in a way, I was satisfied with this “entry” into the ChRI authorities. Now I could legitimately refuse my appointment and go home in peace. But as I reached the door Maskhadov called me back: The meeting will start in an hour, please go to the Central Control Center. I didn’t know what he was talking about and so, after taking my leave, I asked a guard what the Central Control Center ( TsKP ) was, and where it was. The guard told me that it was the Central Command Post, and that I could reach it on the first floor of the Presidential Palace, in the right wing. I headed for my destination, keeping the order in my pocket. I still keep it in my personal archive. As I walked, I thought to myself: Something is rotten in the state of Denmark. The subsequent history of the Republic confirmed the validity of my hypothesis.

False alarms. Luckly!

Between 29 and 30 August , at the Ishcherskaya checkpoint , we arrested a boy of about 25 from the Stavropol District. Subjected to inspection, in his backpack we found a T-shirt, underwear, a black mask and a full-face balaclava, as well as a silk rope of about one meter in length. In his pocket we found a letter which, we discovered, was addressed to his sister. We questioned him about the purpose of his trip to Chechnya, and he replied without hesitation that he had come to join the opposition and protect the Russians from the oppression and violence of the Dudaevites. He said that he had already fought in Yugoslavia, on the side of the Serbs, and that the mask and the rope he had already used there. He said that once he reached his destination he would send the letter to his sister, the only one who loved him, to inform her of his arrival. After detaining him, I called for ad AN – 2 from Khankala delivered him to Grozny. A few days later the “volunteer” was shown on TV and President Dudaev, in front of the reporters, after showing the mask and the cordon, read aloud the “letter from a volunteer”.

As I wrote earlier, all settlements in the region were equipped with radio stations, there was a consolidated link between the district and the village commander’s offices, at any time of day I could contact the commander of each village and know the situation in this settlement. In addition to ensuring the safety of the Naur region from the Avturkhanov opposition, we, through our local supporters in the village of Znamenskoye , who were not few, monitored what was happening in the opposition camp, and relayed reports to Grozny. We had a signalman who knew radio stations well once he served in Afghanistan as radio operator in a GRU sabotage detachment.

One day, the operator tuned in to the opposition radio station in Znamenskoye , and listened to a radio conversation of our opponents that was endlessly repeated: Tonight , at zero – zero, the time X arrives. Fearing to be heard, I decided to deliver the report personally, and went to Grozny myself. Arriving at the Presidential Palace, I went to the Central Command Post, but found no one. It was late at night, but the news was too important, so I went to the sixth (or possibly seventh) floor, where Colonel Merzhuyev ‘s office was located . After listening to me, he confirmed my fears: Apparently tonight, or early in the morning, something will happen. The Ingush [I don’t know who he was referring to] received orders from Moscow to block the Rostov – Baku highway and to keep it ready for the mass advance of military vehicles.

Merzhuyev was visibly agitated by my message. Before leaving, he asked me to warn Abu Arsanukaev , commander of the Presidential Guard, to strengthen security around the Palace. Having found Arsanukaev , I sent him Mershuyev ‘s order , and he began to tinker with the armored vehicle parked at the entrance, a BRDM armed with a machine gun. After a brief check, it became clear that the vehicle’s machine gun was unable to fire. The guards present began to look for an alternative: it seems that a tank was available, stationed around a nearby corner, but that it was unable to move and that they should have towed it.

I thought, disconsolately, about the conversation with Merzhuyev , while observing the readiness or rather, the non-readiness of the defense of the Presidential Palace in the event of an attack. I returned to Ishcherskaya , waiting for the impending attack. Fortunately, neither that day nor the next day did anything happen. A week or two later Mershuyev apparently quit for health reasons.

Musa Merzhuyev (left) attends the Independence Day military parade, September 6, 1993

The hardest two hours of my life

On 23 August 1994 an opposition unit, mounted on trucks and escorted by two T – 64s, appeared near Chernokozovo, a few kilometers from Naurskaya. Waiting for him was a crowd of local residents, led by the Prefect, Aindi Akhaev , who literally seized the tanks, disarmed the avturkhanovites and sent them back, with a promise never to come back armed. Shortly thereafter, I received an ultimatum from Avturkhanov: either we would return the wagons to him and remove the roadblocks, or, in his words, he would march into the district in bloody boots . Receiving no response from us, he sent a messenger and asked me for a meeting on the bridge between Ishcherskaya and Znamenskoye . I accepted, and went to the birdge. Halfway there was a Volga, from which first a tall man with blond hair got out, then Avturkhanov.

We shook hands. His was sweaty, and visibly trembling. I mocked him, asking: What is it, Umar, don’t you have reliable Chechens to use as bodyguards? He muttered back to me, then moved on to threats. He asked me to return the tanks to him, and to my refusal he replied: I’ll give you two hours, otherwise I’ll reduce you to dust! He did not insist again on the dismantling of the roadblock, perhaps he had forgotten. I replied aloud, in Russian: we’ll see who cancels whom. We are waiting for you. I went back to my companions and told them about our conversation. We prepared to repel the attack. Fifteen minutes later, on the other side of the river we noticed a great commotion: civilian cars were massing at the checkpoint, a ZPU-2 anti-aircraft gun had appeared out of nowhere, and its turret rotated left and right, aimed at ours. locations.

The moment was very tense, and some of us started running away. A police officer who was with me along with four of his fellow soldiers stated that he had been urgently recalled to the District Police Department, and that they should leave us. I couldn’t resist, and I let them go. Other militiamen also left. I had to do something, so I ordered one of the tanks we had seized to be placed at the entrance to the Checkpoint, and aimed the gun at our opponents. At the sight of the tank, the opposition militants on the other side began to fidget, running back and forth. Two painful hours passed while we awaited the attack. If there had been a well-organized attack, we would never have been able to keep the bridge. They would have taken the tank back from us, and no one could have helped us. The difference between our forces and theirs was too great, we barely had two magazines each, and neither of us had military experience. If Avturkhanov had persisted, the bridge would have fallen. At the time I did not understand why he considered it so important to enter the Naursk District, being able to use the road from Lomaz – Yurt to Znamenskoye , along the right side of the Terek, to get to Grozny. Only some time ago, in a conversation with a guy who was an opposition militant at the time, I learned that the anti – Dudaevites had trouble getting the equipment through that street, because the inhabitants of Lomaz – Yurt (now Bratskoye ) they were for the most part supporters of Dudaev, and opposed arms in hand to the passing of arms against the government. Avturkhanov wanted to check the bridge in order to use the road on the left bank of the Terek. But these things I learned only later. I was not aware of this at the time, and I did not understand what this opposition showdown was for.

Eventually Avturkhanov gave up. There was no attack. The Avturkhanovites limited themselves to undermining their side of the bridge and damaging it, leaving only a narrow pedestrian passage. That day I learned about who was with me: I was very proud of the companions who remained. To be honest, these two hours were perhaps the hardest hours of my life for me. The most difficult because for the first time, I had to make a decision that could have had serious consequences. In those days the Chechens were not so indifferent to the bloodshed of their compatriots, they were not yet hardened by the hatred due to political differences!

After the war, when I was director of the National Security Service, I learned from an inmate that the Provisional Council had organized the August 23 Raid to try to take over the entire district. The raid on Naurskaya, stopped by Akhaev in Chernokozovo , was supposed to induce the population of the district to surrender, taking the militia behind while they were busy defending the checkpoints. What Avturkhanov’s strategists had not considered was the courage of the people of Naursk and Mekenskaya . They were simple people, but very determined, who with their courage made the plan of our adversaries fail.

Dudaev (left) Maskhadov (centre) Edilov (Right)

VERSIONE ITALIANA

PARTE II

Il primo incontro con Maskhadov

Il mio primo incontro con Aslan Maskhadov, Capo di Stato Maggiore Generale delle Forze Armate della Repubblica Cecena è avvenuto pochi giorni dopo la mia nomina. Quel giorno fui convocato a Grozny per una riunione dei comandanti delle unità militari. Arrivato a Grozny, mi presentai nel suo ufficio, che se non ricordo male si trovava al secondo piano dell’edificio che ospitava il Quartier Generale. Dopo una breve anticamera fui chiamato da una delle sue guardie ed invitato ad entrare. L’ufficio di Maskhadov, allora ancora Colonnello, non era grande. Egli era seduto sulla sua scrivania e scriveva. Lo salutai con il consueto saluto ceceno, lui si alzò dalla sedia e rispose con un contro saluto. Quando ebbe finito di scrivere, mi guardò e mi chiese quale fosse lo scopo della mia visita.

Mi presentai, e l’ordine di Merzhuyev riguardo la mia nomina a Comandante dei distretti di Naursk e Nadterechny gli fu posto sul tavolo. Maskhadov prese il documento, lo lesse, barrò una frase con la penna e mi disse: Fallo rifare, non ho abbastanza poliziotti. E mi restituì l’ordine. Io presi il foglio e guardai che cosa avesse cancellato. Dopo aver visto la sua correzione il sangue mi andò alla testa, il mio viso iniziò a bruciare di eccitazione. Maskhadov aveva barrato “Capitano della Polizia”. Trattenendo a fatica l’indignazione, risposi: Non ho chiesto io questa posizione, non andrò da nessuno e non scriverò nulla! Ad essere onesti, in un certo modo, ero soddisfatto di questo “ingresso” nelle autorità della ChRI. Ora potevo legittimamente rifiutare la mia nomina e tornare a casa in pace. Ma come raggiunsi la porta Maskhadov mi richiamò: La riunione comincerà tra un’ora, fatti trovare al Centro di Controllo Centrale. Io non sapevo di cosa stesse parlando e così, dopo essermi congedato, chiesi ad una guardia che cosa fosse il Centro di Controllo Centrale (TsKP), e dove si trovasse. La guardia mi precisò che si trattava del Posto di Comando Centrale, e che avrei potuto raggiungerlo al primo piano del Palazzo Presidenziale, nell’ala destra.

Dopo aver salutato, mi avviai verso la mia destinazione, tenendo l’ordine in tasca. Lo conservo ancora, nel mio archivio personale. Mentre camminavo, pensai tra me e me: “C’è del marcio in Danimarca”. La successiva storia della Repubblica confermò la validità di questa mia ipotesi.

Falsi allarmi. Per fortuna!

Tra il 29 ed il 30 Agosto, al posto di blocco di Ishcherskaya, fermammo un ragazzo di circa 25 anni proveniente dal Distretto di Stavropol. Sottoposto ad ispezione, nel suo zaino trovammo una maglietta, della biancheria, una maschera nera ed un passamontagna integrale, oltre ad una corda di seta di circa un metro di lunghezza. In tasca gli trovammo una lettera che, scoprimmo, era indirizzata alla sorella. Lo interrogammo riguardo lo scopo del suo viaggio in Cecenia, e lui rispose senza esitazione che era venuto per unirsi all’opposizione e proteggere i russi dall’oppressione e dalla violenza dei dudaeviti. Disse che aveva già combattuto in Jugoslavia, dalla parte dei serbi, e che la maschera e la corda li aveva già usati lì. Disse che una volta giunto a destinazione avrebbe inviato la lettera alla sorella, l’unica che gli volesse bene, per comunicarle il suo arrivo. Dopo averlo trattenuto, feci arrivare un AN – 2 da Khankala e lo feci consegnare a Grozny. Pochi giorni dopo il “volontario” fu mostrato alla TV ed il Presidente Dudaev, davanti ai giornalisti,  dopo aver mostrato la maschera ed il cordone, lesse ad alta voce la “lettera di un volontario”.

Come ho scritto in precedenza, tutti gli insediamenti della regione erano dotati di stazioni radio, c’era un collegamento consolidato tra il distretto e gli uffici del comandante del villaggio, a qualsiasi ora del giorno potevo contattare il comandante Di ogni villaggio e conoscere la situazione in questo insediamento. Oltre a garantire la sicurezza della regione di Naur da parte dell’opposizione di Avturkhanov, noi, attraverso i nostri sostenitori locali nel villaggio di Znamenskoye, che non erano pochi, monitoravamo quanto stava accadendo nel campo dell’opposizione, e trasmettevamo rapporti a Grozny. Avevamo un segnalatore che conosceva bene le stazioni radio, una volta ha attraversato l’Afghanistan dove era un operatore radio in un distaccamento di sabotaggio del GRU.

Un giorno, l’operatore si sintonizzò sulla stazione radio dell’opposizione a Znamenskoye, ed ascoltò una conversazione radio dei nostri avversari che si ripeteva incessantemente: Questa notte, a zero – zero, arriva l’ora X. Temendo che anche le nostre conversazioni fossero ascoltate, decisi di recapitare il rapporto personalmente, e mi recai di persona a Grozny. Giunto al Palazzo Presidenziale, mi recai al Posto di Comando Centrale, ma non trovai nessuno. Era notte fonda, ma la notizia era troppo importante, così mi recai al sesto (o forse al settimo) piano, dove si trovava l’ufficio del Colonnello Merzhuyev. Dopo avermi ascoltato, questi confermò i miei timori: A quanto pare questa notte, o al mattino presto, succederà qualcosa. L’Inguscio [non so a chi si riferisse] ha ricevuto ordini da Mosca di bloccare l’autostrata Rostov – Baku e di tenerla pronta per l’avanzata in massa di mezzi militari.

Merzhuyev era visibilmente agitato dal mio messaggio. Prima di prendere commiato, mi chiese di avvisare Abu Arsanukaev, comandante della Guardia Presidenziale, di rafforzare la sicurezza intorno al Palazzo. Trovato Arsanukaev, gli trasmisi l’ordine di Mershuyev, e questi si mise ad armeggiare con il mezzo blindato parcheggiato all’ingresso, un BRDM armato di mitragliatrice. Dopo un breve controllo, fu chiaro che la mitragliatrice del veicolo non era in grado di sparare. Le guardie presenti si misero a cercare un’alternativa: pare che fosse disponibile un carro armato, appostato dietro ad un angolo lì vicino, ma che non fosse in grado di muoversi e che avrebbero dovuto rimorchiarlo.

Ripensai, sconsolato, alla conversazione con Merzhuyev, mentre osservavo la prontezza o meglio, la non prontezza della difesa del Palazzo Presidenziale in caso di attacco. Tornai ad Ishcherskaya, aspettando l’attacco imminente. Fortunatamente, né quel giorno, né il giorno successivo accadde nulla. Una o due settimane dopo Mershuyev si licenziò a quanto pare per motivi di salute. Non l’ho più visto

Le due ore più difficili della mia vita

Il 23 Agosto 1994 un reparto dell’opposizione, montato su camion e scortato da due T – 64 comparve nei pressi di Chernokozovo, a pochi chilometri da Naur. Ad attenderlo c’era una folla di residenti locali, guidati dal Prefetto, Aindi Akhaev, i quali letteralmente sequestrarono i carri armati, disarmarono gli avturkhanoviti e li rispedirono indietro, con la promessa di non tornare mai più armati. Poco dopo ricevetti un ultimatum da Avturkhanov: o gli restituivamo i carri e rimuovevamo i posti di blocco, oppure, citando le sue parole, egli avrebbe marciato sul distretto con gli stivali insenguinati. Non ricevendo da noi alcuna risposta, inviò un messaggero e mi chiese un incontro sul ponte tra Ishcherskaya e Znamenskoye. Io accettai, e mi recai sul ponte. A metà strada c’era una Volga, dalla quale scese dapprima un uomo alto, coi capelli biondi, poi Avturkhanov.

Ci stringemmo la mano. La sua era sudata, e visibilmente tremante. Lo irrisi, chiedendogli: Che c’è, Umar, non hai ceceni affidabili da usare come guardie del corpo? Quello mi rispose bofonchiando, poi passò alle minacce. Mi chiese di restituirgli i carri armati, e al mio rifiuto rispose: ti do due ore, altrimenti vi riduco in polvere! Non insistette nuovamente sullo smantellamento del posto di blocco, forse se n’era dimenticato. Io gli risposi ad alta voce, in russo: vedremo chi cancellerà chi. Vi aspettiamo. Tornai dai miei compagni e raccontai loro della nostra conversazione. Ci preparammo a respingere l’attacco. Quindici minuti dopo, dall’altra parte del fiume notammo un gran trambusto: auto civili si stavano ammassando al posto di blocco, un cannone antiaereo ZPU – 2 era apparso dal nulla, e la sua torretta ruotava a destra e a sinistra, diretta contro le nostre posizioni.

Il momento era molto teso, ed alcuni di noi iniziarono a darsela a gambe. Un ufficiale di polizia che era con me insieme a quattro suoi commilitoni dichiarò che era stato richiamato urgentemente al Dipartimento di Polizia Distrettuale, e che avrebbero dovuto lasciarci. Non potevo oppormi, e li lasciai partire. Anche altri miliziani se ne andarono. Dovevo fare qualcosa, e allora ordinai che uno dei carri che avevamo sequestrato fosse posizionato all’ingresso del Checkpoint, e che puntasse il cannone contro i nostri avversari.  Alla vista del carro, dall’altra parte i militanti dell’opposizione iniziarono ad agitarsi, correndo avanti e indietro. Passarono due ore dolorose, mentre attendevamo l’attacco. Se ci fosse stato un attacco ben organizzato, non avremmo mai potuto tenere il ponte. Loro ci avrebbero ripreso il carro armato, e nessuno avrebbe potuto aiutarci. La differenza tra le nostre forze e le loro era troppo grande, noi avevamo appena due caricatori a testa, e nessuno di noi aveva esperienza militare. Se Avturkhanov avesse insistito, il ponte sarebbe caduto. Sul momento non capivo perché ritenesse così importante penetrare nel Distretto di Naursk, potendo utilizzare la strada che da Lomaz – Yurt procede pe Znamenskoye, costeggiando il lato destro del Terek, per arrivare a Grozny. Soltanto qualche tempo da, conversando con un tizio che a quel tempo era un militante dell’opposizione, ho saputo che gli anti – dudaeviti avevano problemi a far passare l’equipaggiamento da quella strada, perché gli abitanti di Lomaz – Yurt (oggi Bratskoye) erano per la maggior parte sostenitori di Dudaev, e si opponevano armi in pugno al passaggio di armi contro il governo. Avturkhanov voleva controllare il ponte per poter usare la strada sulla sponda sinistra del Terek. Ma queste cose le ho sapute soltanto dopo. All’epoca non ne ero informato, e non capivo a cosa servisse questa prova di forza da parte dell’opposizione. 

Alla fine Avturkhanov desistette. Non ci fu alcun attacco. Gli avturkhanoviti si limitarono a minare il loro versante del ponte e a danneggiarlo, lasciando soltanto uno stretto passaggio pedonale. Quel giorno imparai a conoscere chi era con me: fui molto orgoglioso dei compagni che erano rimasti. Ad essere sincero, per me  queste due ore sono state forse le ore più difficili della mia vita. Le più difficili perché per la prima volta, dovetti prendere una decisione che avrebbe potuto produrre gravi conseguenze. A quei tempi i ceceni non erano così indifferenti allo spargimento di sangue dei loro compatrioti, non erano ancora induriti dall’odio dovuto alle differenze politiche!

Dopo la guerra, quando ero direttore del Servizio di Sicurezza Nazionale, seppi da un detenuto che il Consiglio Provvisorio aveva organizzato il Raid del 23 Agosto per tentare di impossessarsi dell’intero distretto. Il raid su Naur, fermato da Akhaev a Chernokozovo, avrebbe dovuto indurre la popolazione del distretto ad arrendersi, prendendo la milizia alle spalle mentre era impegnata a difendere i posti di blocco. Quello che gli strateghi di Avturkhanov non avevano considerato era il coraggio delle popolazioni di Naursk e di Mekenskaya. Si trattava di persone semplici, ma molto determinate, che con il loro coraggio fecero fallire il piano dei nostri avversari.

“THE ORIGIN OF THE WAR” – Akhyad Idigov’s speech to the PACE working group

Idigov Ahyad : Thank you for inviting the Chechen delegation to your meeting. President Aslan Maskhadov sent me here, realizing the importance of a political solution of the conflict in relations with Russia with the direct participation of the West in this process, we consider the work of the OWG as the beginning of the work to achieve peace with the participation of these three parties, without which it is not possible to achieve stability in general and in perspective. Of course, a significant disadvantage of the formation of the Joint Working Group, according to the PACE decision, is that today, under the pretext that the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, in violation of international law, is an unrecognized state, our parliamentarians do not have been included in this important international body. If there are militarily opposing entities, the denial of the right of one of them to participate in the peace process is an unacceptable discrimination, in our case this happens in relation to the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria. We hope that the misunderstanding will be corrected soon. We have already presented proposals from the Chechen side to PACE on this.

As we know, the OWG should contribute to the implementation of resolutions no. 1444 and n. 1456 of 2000. and resolution no. 1221 of the same year, as well as some similar documents adopted at other times on the military situation in Chechnya. The resolutions call for peace between the belligerents and also indicate that Russia, a member of the Council of Europe, should follow the principles of this organization and not hesitate to find a political solution to the question. At the same time, they also ask the Chechen side for political dialogue, expressing protest against terrorism and extremism. You know that the president of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria Maskhadov has declared his willingness to sit at the negotiating table, following the deliberations of the PACE , without any preconditions. However, this political process of peaceful settlement of the issue is interrupted by the Russian Federation-Russia. We ask: what will we do next? Will we call those who disturb the order in the European home to order, or will we say: “Everything is lawful for Russia”? This may therefore mean that the Council of Europe grants permission for violations of a similar nature to all other states. This may also mean that the Council of Europe no longer follows its basic principles.

Parliamentary gentlemen! The Chechen Republic of Ichkeria is part of Europe. More than 40 European commissions have visited Chechnya since the beginning of the second Russo-Chechen war. What have they done? Nothing has been done, people have been killed, tortured in concentration camps and all this is continuing …

I take this opportunity to hand over to the Secretary General of PACE Haller Bruno a document with my powers from President A. Maskhadov . Here too I offer a statement by the president of my country, Aslan Maskhadov , on the situation in and around Chechnya. In the statement, as can be seen, there are proposals on the world negotiation process between the Chechen Republic-Ichkeria and the Russian Federation-Russia. I am pleased to have the opportunity to present to you the legislative basis for the formation of the Chechen state since the collapse of the USSR. Along with this, I will try to present to you our vision of a way out of the deadlock in relations between Chechnya and Russia. All of this is of fundamental importance to us, since Russian propaganda brings false information to the whole world about the alleged illegality of the Chechen government’s actions.

Before the collapse of the Soviet Union (December 1991), the autonomous republics were transformed into union republics on April 26, 1990, in accordance with the law on the delimitation of powers between the USSR and the subjects of the Federation. And they began to be called the autonomous republics: the Soviet Socialist Republic of North Ossetia, the Soviet Dagestan, the Kalmyk Soviet Socialist Republic , etc. Thus, the republics that formed the USSR became – 35 (15 + 20). At the same time, almost simultaneously, the USSR recognized the independence of the three Baltic republics (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia). The Chechen Republic was the one which, in addition to being renamed a trade union republic, also adopted all the attributes of an independent state. And he completed this process with the adoption of the Constitution on March 12, 1992. Everything was rigorously verified with international law, the laws of the RSFSR and the USSR. Declaration on State Sovereignty of the RSFSR of 12 June 1990.

And on March 31, 1992, when the Federal Treaty on the formation of a new state of the Russian Federation was signed – Russia between the RSFSR and the new union republics of the USSR, Chechnya did not participate in it.

On March 12, 1992, the Chechen Republic adopted a new constitution for an independent democratic state. All these processes took place in a coherent and peaceful way, although times were turbulent. Of course, they debated whether it was necessary to act in this way, because everyone in the world knows that Chechnya was included in the Russian Empire due to the colonial war. But the point was that the Russian empire – the USSR had collapsed. This gave them the right to self-determination. The very idea of independence was born because it is so far the only known mechanism in the world through which more or less all people can guarantee their safety. This is the main reason why the Chechen people were guided in choosing the right to build their own independent state.

After the end of the game in the “legal state” in the Russian Federation, the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR was dissolved in October 1993. The new constitution of the Russian Federation was adopted illegally, arbitrarily inscribing an independent Chechen state! Basically, a “rule” was established in the constitution of the Russian Federation-Russia, which made it possible to wage war against an entire people, which is contrary to international law. It became clear that the new Russian Federation-Russia had deviated from the legal norms it was supposed to follow. Everything proceeded according to a new circle of imperial traditions, and this required the image of the enemy. The authorities have chosen the Chechen people as guilty of all the problems and shortcomings in the Russian Federation-Russia. And it will serve (according to them) as a unifying principle in the rebirth of the empire.

Hence the provocations of the Russian special services against the Chechen Republic until 1995, to start the first war, the explosions of houses in Moscow and other cities in the period 1996-1999, to start the second phase of the war. The Russian government needs war, so it continues to maintain the military situation in Chechnya, so the Russian Federation-Russia does not seek peace and refuses it to the West, which here wants stability in order to obtain favorable conditions for investments. But the Russian Federation-Russia is against it, so the war will continue until it becomes unprofitable for the Kremlin leadership, or until the West seriously demands an end to the genocide of the Chechen people and the establishment of peace on the basis of international law.

This is where, in our view, the roots of this bloody war lie. Any other peace-seeking method, regardless of the above, is doomed to fail early, as it provokes a new round of warfare, which plays into the game of the Russian army and Moscow itself as a whole. Flirting with numerous third and fourth forces means ignoring the resolution of the question of centuries of confrontation, which begins a new cycle of empire rebirth. And all this is an attempt to escape the solution of the problem of stability in the Caucasus. If the OWG can focus its attention on the areas that President Maskhadov talks about in his statement, the work of this respected international group of parliamentarians can be effective.

At the same time, we recognize that in all actions taken by the Chechen side to seek peace, there may be errors. In the course of the hostilities caused by the Russian aggression against Chechnya, there may be violations by the Chechen defense forces, and we do not approve of that. However, I would like to express myself on this in the words of Lohman Dietrich (Human Rights Watch), who gave a conference in the English Parliament on 28 February this year, in which I attended, as well as Lord Judd, who is here. These words were as follows: “The number of violations by Chechen fighters is negligible compared to what Russian troops are doing.”

I’m trying to talk about the fundamental things that everything else depends on.

How the OWG will act: the near future will show it and our collaboration with you in the future will depend on it. I wish it were fruitful and useful ….

Furthermore, Mr. Idigov spoke about the work done by the Parliament and the President of Chechnya in search of peace. On the creation and functioning in England of the “International Campaign for Peace and Human Rights in Chechnya” … He outlined the position of President A. Maskhadov and the Parliament on the events taking place in Chechnya.

ICHKERIA IN UCRAINA: I BATTAGLIONI DUDAEV E MANSUR

Il 26 Febbraio il Presidente del Gabinetto dei Ministri della Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria, Akhmed Zakayev, ha proclamato in piazza che il governo stava progettando la formazione di unità armate da inviare in supporto all’esercito ucraino per sostenerne gli sforzi bellici. Nel paese, comunque, già combattono reparti leali ad Ichkeria e che ne rivendicano una continuità ideale. Si tratta dei battaglioni Dzhokhar Dudaev e Sheikh Mansour, attivi già da anni sul fronte del Donbass ed ora impegnati a contrastare l’invasione russa.

DALLA CECENIA ALL’UCRAINA

Lo scoppio di Euromaidan e la crisi politica che investì l’Ucraina, l’invasione russa della Crimea e la secessione delle regioni russofone di Lugansk e Donec, tra la fine del 2013 ed i primi mesi del 2014, produssero fermento tra la diaspora cecena in Ucraina, direttamente interessata dagli eventi, e tra i superstiti delle forze armate della Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria in esilio all’estero. Il sentimento di opposizione all’imperialismo russo, unito al senso di vicinanza maturato tra gli indipendentisti ceceni, dovuto in parte al supporto offerto, a suo tempo, da un gruppo di volontari ucraini che aveva preso parte alla Prima Guerra Russo – Cecena (1994 – 1996) fece sì che tra i ranghi dei sostenitori della ChRI maturasse l’idea di unirsi alla lotta, inquadrandosi in un battaglione nazionale ceceno. L’idea fu messa in atto da uno dei più noti ufficiali dell’esercito ceceno ancora in vita, il Generale di Brigata Isa Munaev, già Commissario Militare per il Quartiere Zavodskoy di Grozny (dopo la riconquista della Capitale cecena, nell’Agosto del 1996), Capo dell’Ufficio del Ministero per la Sicurezza dello Stato nel Quartiere Zavodskoy (tra il 1998 ed il 1999) e Comandante della Guarnigione di Grozny allo scoppio della Seconda Guerra Russo – Cecena. Egli, dopo aver combattuto durante la Battaglia per Grozny nell’inverno del 1999, aveva combattuto contro le forze federali fino al 2006, rimanendo a Grozny e portando avanti azioni di sabotaggio contro le forze di Mosca, e contro le unità di polizia del governo collaborazionista. Di carattere duro e poco incline al riso, secondo quanto riferito da Mayrbek Vatchagaev, Segretario di Stampa del Presidente Aslan Maskhadov, Era sempre molto teso ed era chiaro che non dovevi scherzare con lui.  Nessuno ha provato a scherzare con lui. Secondo me era l’unico di cui lo stesso Arbi Baraev aveva paura , vivevano nello stesso villaggio e Baraev riuscì, pur vivendo in questo villaggio, a non incrociarlo mai.

Isa Munaev (a sinistra) e Muslim Cheberloevsky (a destra)

Gravemente ferito durante una sparatoria, Munaev era stato evacuato fuori dal Paese, trovando asilo in Danimarca. Allo scoppio della guerra civile in Ucraina, egli poteva definirsi l’ultimo “Generale di Ichkeria” ancora pronto a tornare in armi, ed era alla guida di un movimento sociopolitico chiamato “Free Caucasus”, tramite il quale sosteneva l’idea di un Caucaso indipendente da Mosca secondo il progetto, a suo tempo sostenuto dal primo Presidente della Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria, Dzhokhar Dudaev, chiamato “Casa Caucasica”. Munaev decise di costituire un battaglione di volontari ceceni, e lo dedicò proprio alla memoria di Dudaev. Nell’Ottobre del 2014, quando ormai combatteva da mesi sul fronte del Dombass, Munaev dichiarò ad una conferenza stampa: ventitrè anni fa, Dzhokhar Dudaev avvertì il popolo ucraino, il popolo georgiano, che l’aggressione russa era alle porte. La sua previsione si è avverata. Sapevamo che avrebbero attaccato l’Ucraina e la Georgia, lo sapevamo. La battaglia qui è una battaglia per la libertà di popoli diversi, tra cui Polonia, Slovacchia, Repubblica Ceca, Paesi Baltici, perché saranno i prossimi. Le truppe russe devono essere fermate ora.

CHIAMATA ALLE ARMI

La prima compagnia a formarsi, poche settimane dopo l’avvio del progetto, fu chiamata “Sasha Bily”, in onore al comandante dei volontari ucraini unitisi alle forze di difesa cecene durante la Prima Guerra Russo – Cecena, morto in una sparatoria proprio in quei giorni. Nel giro di pochi mesi il Battaglione, definito “Unità di Mantenimento della Pace” completò i ranghi e definì il suo stato maggiore: al comando dell’unità si pose lo stesso Munaev, mentre Isa Sadigov, ex Viceministro della Difesa dell’Azerbaijan (all’epoca esule in Norvegia) e Ruslan Eltaev, (Comandante di un’unità di milizia durante la Prima Guerra Russo – Cecena e Capo di Stato Maggiore del Fronte Sud – Occidentale durante la Seconda) furono nominati rispettivamente Capo e Vice Capo di Stato Maggiore.  Il forte afflusso di volontari portò in breve tempo al completamento del Battaglione, cosicché Free Caucasus decise di istituirne un secondo. Questo fu intitolato al leggendario eroe nazionale ceceno Sheikh Mansur, e la sua formazione fu affidata a Muslim Cheberloevsky.

Stemma del Battaglione Dzhokhar Dudaev

AZIONI IN DONBASS

Il Battaglione Dudaev fu schierato in Donbass, dove partecipò alle cruente Battaglie per Ilovaisk e, dopo che il corpo d’armata di cui faceva parte finì chiuso in una sacca, agli aspri combattimenti per il Saliente di Debaltsevo. Munaev guidò personalmente il Battaglione, composto non soltanto da ceceni, ma anche da Tartari, Azeri, Daghestani, Ingusci e Ucraini, trasmettendo loro le esperienze acquisite durante le due guerre combattute in Cecenia. Soprattutto quando, allorchè le parti si accordarono per un pacifico deflusso delle forze leali a Kiev da Ilovaisk, l’artiglieria russa si mise a borbardare il nemico in fuga, facendone strage. Rispetto a questo Munaev dichiarò: Lo sappiamo: se i russi accordano un corridoio, è soltanto per bombardarlo. Le operazioni durarono dall’estate del 2014 alla fine di Febbraio del 2015 e, proprio negli ultimi giorni di combattimento, cadde, colpito da un mortaio, lo stesso Isa Munaev. A sostituirlo giunse Adam Osmaev, anch’egli esule, il quale comandò l’unità fino alla fine di Aprile del 2015. Insieme a lui operò la moglie, Amina Okueva, la quale sarebbe morta nel 2017 a seguito di un attentato ai danni di suo marito.

Il Battaglione Sheikh Mansur, invece, fu schierato a sud, sul fronte di Mariupol, dove combatté per tutta la durata del conflitto per il controllo della posizione di Shirokhino. Uno dei comandanti del Battaglione, intervistato da Radio Liberty, tra le altre cose spiegò il motivo della sua partecipazione alla guerra in Ucraina: Per secoli l’esercito russo ha sterminato i ceceni, il genocidio non si ferma. I migliori, i devoti figli della Cecenia, sono considerati dispersi, altri sono in prigione. I nostri nemici si sono accumulati qui, in Ucraina, e intendiamo combatterli fino all’ultimo. Questa è la vendetta per i ceceni e la protezione del popolo ucraino. Prima del nostro arrivo, ceceni locali e alcuni osseti erano dalla parte russa. Quando siamo venuti in aiuto degli ucraini, abbiamo mostrato il vero volto dei ceceni. Molti ceceni che vivono sul territorio dell’Ucraina sono venuti da noi, ci hanno ringraziato, grazie a noi sono rimasti a vivere nelle loro case in Ucraina. 

Stemma del Battaglione Sheikh Mansur