Archivi tag: URSS

Back to the Constitution: Francesco Benedetti interviews Ikhvan Gerikhanov

Dr. Ikhvan Gerikhanov has served the Chechen Republic since 1991. Doctor in law and specialist in comparative studies in international law, with the statute od judge of the highest category, Gerikhanov was Member of the Executive Committee of the National Congress of the Chechen People, Deputy of Parliament on first convocation, and President of the Constitutional Court from 1993 to 1998. He was one of the main authors of the Constitution of 1992, which still today represents the Basic Law of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria.

Today Gerikhanov is the head of the national war crimes tribunal in the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria. About this activity, he said: “The objective of our trinbunal is the collection and evaluation of evidence for the assessment of the presence of signs of genocide and ethnocide of the chechen people, starting from the the time of the Tsar’s autocracy, the communist regime and the modern russian invasion on our territory”.

He currently resides in France. The French government refused him and his family a few weeks ago, political refugee status.

We had a long conversation with him about the Constitution, the legitimacy of ChRI governments, as well as some of the most controversial laws, not forgetting his work as President of the Constitutional Court.

Ikhvan Gerikhanov in front of the text of the newly approved Constitution

Dr. Gerikhanov, when talk about a constitution started?

The first debates regarding the writing of the Constitution began at the moment of the creation of the Provisional Supreme Soviet, on September 7, 1991. This body was attended by former deputies of the Chechen-Ingush Supreme Soviet and popular representatives, and was headed by the future Speaker of the Parliament of the Chechen Republic, Hussein Akhmadov. Joint commissions were created, including a juridical commission for the elaboration of legislative projects concerning the election of the President and the Parliament of the Republic. As a member of the National Congress of the Chechen People (OKChN) and as the only legal scholar (at that time I was a district court judge of the Leninsky district of Grozny, and had recently defended a dissertation on international law at the University of Kiev) I was included in this legal commission, chaired by the former Second Secretary of the regional party committee, Lechi Magomadov. A wonderful person. Many people from all professional backgrounds participated in the discussion of these projects. The discussion was publicized in the media, including through television. Every citizen of the Republic was able to participate.

In 1994, when the war broke out, Magomadov would have been among the main exponents of the unionist government. Don’t you think that the work he did in the legal commission contradicts the choice to take the side of Russia during the First World War?

Magomadov was first of all a worthy and loyal person. Secondly, he fully supported the decisions of the Chechen People’s Congress. At that time he supported the reasons of the people, and did not participate in any opposition. From his work the Chechen nation only benefited. He died in Mecca during the pilgrimage.

If we had to judge people by the episodes, keep in mind that between 2010 and 2012 I directed the Arbitration Tribunal of the Chechen Republic, which is not part of the power system, but helps all those who turn to it in the resolution of civil cases . Due to conflicts with the local authorities, as well as the fact that I refused to pay the “tribute”, they tried to initiate a criminal case against me. And for this reason I was forced to leave my fatherland and my father’s house once again.

Therefore, one cannot judge people by episodes, as life makes its own adjustments, and sometimes a person is forced to live side by side with the enemy. Some supporters of independence still work in various structures today, while in the republic the protégés of the Kremlin rule. This does not mean that they have betrayed the idea of \u200b\u200bfreedom!

In the elections of 27 October 1991 you were elected deputy. Do you remember how Parliament developed the work on the Constitution?

I was elected in the Nadterechny constituency. Once formed, the Parliament adopted as a basis the draft already developed by the legal commission of the Provisional Supreme Soviet and, after a general discussion which also took place through the media, in the presence of journalists, jurists and simple interested parties, the Parliament adopted the Constitution of the Republic Chechen on March 12, 1991, a year and a half before Russia adopted its own. Personally, I was one of the main co-authors of the Constitution. The deputies did not have much time to adopt the Basic Law, since Russia had already declared the election of the President and Parliament illegal, and it was urgent to consolidate sovereignty by law, as promised to the Chechen National People’s Congress. Within the walls of the parliament of the Chechen Republic, in the body of lawyers’ deputies, there were very few lawyers, only four people out of 41 deputies, and it was not easy to adopt the Constitution when the body of deputies consisted of former farm workers and builders. But we all faced this task, and the Constitution of the Chechen Republic was adopted by the Parliament of the Chechen Republic, and we all rejoiced this holiday, regardless of profession and religion!

There were many opposition supporters in Nadterechny District. They declared that the elections were a farce and that they did not take place in their controlled areas. How do you respond to these accusations?

During the election period, there were opposition supporters in Nadterechny District, but only in one place, not everywhere. The population still did not realize what was happening, and was rather neutral. I have personally met with voters in two large settlements, where they know me well, and the electoral commission received the ballots and prepared the elections. Two representatives were elected in this constituency. Unfortunately my colleague died heroically in the First War!

After the promulgation of the constitution, the institutions foreseen by the Basic Law began to be established. One of these was the Constitutional Court, of which you were elected president in March 1993. How did this constitution process take place?


In early 1992, the Parliament of the Chechen Republic adopted the law “On the activities of the Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic” and, according to it, the number of judges was determined at seven people. Well-known lawyers from the Republic, from the Ministry of Justice, from the Public Prosecutor’s Office and from the Supreme Court of the Republic took part in the election of the President of the Constitutional Court. Usman Imaev was nominated by the President of the Chechen Republic, while my fellow deputies convinced me to participate in these elections. I can say that all the judges of the Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic were highly qualified specialists and experienced lawyers. I can be proud of all my colleagues who have had the opportunity to work with them, especially Judge Seda Khalidova, who went through a very difficult path with us and did not become a defector from another government, as some judges have done.

The three leaders of the first call parliament: from left to right, Bektimar Mezhidov (Vice-President), Hussein Akhmadov (President), Magomed Gushakayev (Vice-President)

Why did Dudayev want Imaev in that role?

Usman Imaev was a very knowledgeable lawyer and an excellent executor of all orders of Dzhokhar Dudayev. I would have been happy and satisfied if he had been elected head of the Constitutional Court, but the Parliament saw me, probably, not as an executor of someone else’s orders, but as a learned lawyer, and a person of principle. For example, once elected I was the first of the chechen leaders to meet V. Zorkin, President of the Russian Constitutional Court. On that occasion we prepared a joint agreement ready to be signed, but this was not possible due to the current crisis of power in the Republic.

What activities did the Constitutional Court perform?

The Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic fulfilled its direct duties of protection of the constitutional order and in strict compliance with the provisions of the Constitution, regardless of the origin of the legislative acts, be it the President or the Parliament.

We have repeatedly made decisions on the inconsistency of our Constitution with the Decrees of the President and the Parliament of the Chechen Republic, which at first were taken for granted.
Then, when the confrontation between the legislative and executive bodies became an open conflict, the intervention of our court, and that of its president were not fully received correctly and each side wanted to see the Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic as “partisan ”, which was impossible, because the court was established to protect the constitutional order and not the branches of power.

The Constitution establishes that Parliament holds the legislative power, and this has the right to approve presidential appointments and to control the work of civil servants. President Dudayev’s reluctance to follow these instructions has led to serious tensions between the president and parliament. What was the origin of these tensions?

The main reason for the confrontation between the legislature and the executive was the misunderstanding or non-acceptance of the fact that the Republic was parliamentary. Many members of the government, including the President, could not bear it. At the very beginning of the confrontation between these branches of power, the Constitutional Court and its chairman issued dozens of official statements on the need to follow the requirements of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic and on the fact that such an escalation of tension could lead to consequences unpredictable.

I don’t know the reason behind this non-acceptance of the parliamentary nature of the Republic, but I can say that around Dudayev there were many sycophants who could influence his decision. I myself was dumbfounded by his behavior, when he sent a late night messenger asking me or advice on key legal matters. After agreeing on these matters, Dzhokhar publicly stated the opposite, and when I asked him why he did this, he referred to unknown people who convinced him against our agreement!

Many members of the entourage of the President of the Chechen Republic literally influenced Dzhokhar Dudayev about the negative influence of the parliament of the Chechen Republic in state building, having their own personal and mercantile interests. Issues of a legislative nature were resolved at the household level, ignoring the requirements of the Constitution and other regulatory acts. First of all, it was a confrontation between the forces of order: the Public Prosecutor’s Office and the Ministry of Internal Affairs. Each of them resolved the issue from the point of view of his participation in the process of declaring sovereignty, and not from the legal point of view of fulfilling his direct duties.
All this led to chaos and mutual misunderstanding, while those who could not be authorized to manage state bodies also very actively intervened: various parties, organizations of the elderly, athletes and cultural figures, who were assigned positions in based on their popularity in their business field.


On April 10 and 17, 1993, President Dudayev issued a series of decrees establishing direct presidential rule and dissolving parliament, decrees which were declared illegal by the Constitutional Court. Do you remember exactly what these decrees contained and why he declared them illegal?

The Constitutional Court has recognized the President’s Decrees regarding the dissolution of the supreme legislative body as illegitimate, as they grossly contradict the provisions of the Constitution. The content of the decree of the President of the Chechen Republic on the dissolution of the supreme legislative body of the country stated that, in order to preserve the sovereignty and political system, and due to the loss of confidence in it, in accordance with Art. 73 of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic the Parliament of the Chechen Republic should have been dissolved. In truth, the art. 73 of the Constitution of the CRI does not guarantee the President these powers, not even in times of war. He could suspend the activities of all authorities by imposing martial law, but this was not done at the time, since there was no reason to do so. The action exercised by Dudayev, in legal language is called “seizure of power”. which is prohibited by art. 2 of the Constitution.

As mentioned above, the Constitutional Court has applied all means to resolve this conflict and, as the head of the highest legislative body, I have personally asked and spoken to the President of the Parliament and almost all the deputies, as well as the President of the Republic, so that this confrontation would not result in a violation of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic and in an armed conflict. However, each side considered itself on the right side, and we are all witnesses and eyewitnesses of what happened next. The Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic, on the basis of the obligation to control and safeguard the state system, has correctly pronounced the illegitimacy of the acts of dissolution of the supreme legislative body, not being able otherwise by the judicial body, called to respond to violations of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic.


In the same period, the parliament called a referendum on trust in President Dudayev and in Parliament itself, which the Constitutional Court deemed acceptable. Was this referendum legitimate?


When the confrontation between legislative and executive authority reached a critical point, the Parliament made use of its constitutional right, provided for by paragraph 24 of art. 64 of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic on the popular vote, to hold a referendum on the issue of trust in the authorities and regarding the form of government of the state. This decision is the prerogative of the Parliament of the Chechen Republic and only it can take such a decision, if it deems it necessary, without the consent of any branch of power. These days the crisis of power, with the exception of the judiciary, was in full swing and turned into an open confrontation, with the subsequent armed intervention of the police forces during the dissolution of the Parliament of the Chechen Republic.

Dzhokhar Dudaev votes in the elections of 27 October 1991

On June 3, 1993, Dudayev rejected the opinion of the Constitutional Court regarding the legitimacy of the referendum, declaring it a “perversion of the law”. Why, in your opinion, was Dudayev so against the referendum?


We have tried to solve this process with all diplomatic methods, up to involving respected people and elders. A conciliation group was created headed by the president of the Academy of Sciences, doctor of physical and mathematical sciences Khamzat Ibragimov, in which I was also included. I spoke to Dzhokhar repeatedly on this matter, but after every conversation he did not operate as required by the Constitution. He believed, like everyone in his entourage, that the parliament of the Chechen Republic acts in favor of the opposition, and that the parliamentarians themselves are on several “barricades” of this crisis.

After the coup d’état of 4 June 1993, the Constitutional Court remained the only institution recognized by the Constitution on a permanent basis. On 18 June it issued a statement on the illegality of the government’s actions. Do you remember the contents of this court statement? What reactions has it elicited?



The Constitutional Court of the Chechen Republic suspended work on the administration of justice on my initiative, because after the court decision on the illegality of dissolving the Parliament of the Chechen Republic, our judges and staff began to fear retribution from the radicals , who saw in this decision only an opposition to the President of the Chechen Republic and nothing else. In this regard, this opinion still remains rooted in some supporters of sovereignty today, although there was and could not be any conflict between the Constitutional Court and the President, neither at an institutional level, nor at a personal level. The highest judicial body, within its powers, performed the duties assigned to it to protect the Constitution and the constitutional order, revealing violations that ignored the requirements of the Basic Law of the land, regardless of grades and degrees, and the position held in power and in this society.


How did relations develop between you and Dudayev, and between you and the government in general, after June 1993? Are you under pressure, threats or attempts on your life?

There was no, and there could be no public persecution and threats, since even to my detractors it was clear that I was fulfilling my duties, regardless of the roles and positions of violators of the requirements of the Constitution of the Chechen Republic.


With the outbreak of the First Russo-Chechen War the authorities of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria were placed under martial law. As a lawman, and a senior state official, how did you serve the cause of independence?


Since the beginning of the first war in December 1994, I have been at the forefront of opponents of armed conflict and have organized national and international conferences, as well as roundtables on the cessation of hostilities in my Motherland, condemning Russia’s military and political leadership. Having the moral and institutional responsibility to preserve sovereignty, as well as to stop hostilities on our territory, as president of the Constitutional Court, I have adopted all the methods and means at my disposal to inform the world and the Russian public opinion about the crime of this war and about the existence of the ongoing genocide against my people. To do this, I involved Russian government officials, as well as personally holding press conferences and organizing international conferences, with the participation of world-renowned scientists, conflict specialists and experts from the United Nations.

A number of conferences were held in the building of the international organization “Federation of Peace and Accord”, which has an advisory office at the United Nations. I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude to the leadership of this organization, especially to the deputy chairman of the Society, MGIMO professor Andrey Melvil, who impartially helped me and provided every opportunity for the world to hear the voice of the Chechen people, who was being exterminated under carpet bombing by the Russian military forces.

Gerikhanov (right) participates in the negotiations for the release of hostages during the Budennovsk crisis

One of the events that saw you protagonist in the period 1994 – 1996 were the negotiations following the Budennovsk hostage crisis. Why were you involved in these negotiations, and how did they unfold?

During this time I was in Moscow and was approached by the Minister of Nationalities of Russia V. Mikhailov, who asked me for help in freeing the hostages, as I was one of the highest officials of the republic. Naturally I could not refuse this request, knowing that the hostages were women and children. Considering myself morally responsible and in general, as a lawyer and also as a simple person, not accepting this way of making war, I went to the place. Upon arrival in Budennovsk, I went to the headquarters for the release of hostages, where N. Yegorov, the Deputy Prime Minister of the Government of the Russian Federation, Stepashin, the director of the FSB and other officials of the Russian side were. Then I went to the hospital, and finally participated in the negotiations and drafting of the documents relating to the conditions for the release of the hostages. At the same time, I had to involve the Prime Minister of the Russian Federation V. Chernomyrdin in this process through Mikhailov in order to have guarantees that the conditions set by Shamil Basaev were met.

My participation in the release of the hostages was decisive, because knowing the situation, I assumed responsibility as an official and as a Chechen: without this happening it would have been impossible to complete this negotiation. I was helped in this by two other compatriots of mine, whom I thank for the courage shown in this situation, in which we were all risking our lives. The important thing was that the result was positive: the hostages were released (over 1200 hostages, mostly women and children) and hostilities on the territory of the republic were stopped, which saved tens and hundreds of civilian lives, and started a dialogue between the warring parties which ended with negotiations peacemakers of Khasavyurt.

Besides that, you worked for the establishment of an international tribunal for Chechnya.

In 1995-1996 I was one of the organizers of the Public International Tribunal for crimes against humanity and war crimes in the Chechen Republic. The presiding judge was Galina Starovoitova, who was killed for her civilian activity by war supporters. The books have been published for some time and are directly accessible via the Internet. The court worked in accordance with the current Russian Criminal Procedure Code, and the collection of materials and evidence took place in the court. The members of the court were former and current deputies of the State Duma of the Russian Federation, as well as well-known world-famous lawyers, both Russian and foreign. Among the observers were well-known specialists and distinguished diplomats.
By the way, one of the experts was Olof Palme’s brother Klaus Palme, and among the diplomats – the last USSR Foreign Minister Pankin. We have conducted several phases of the judicial investigation both inside and outside Russia and have examined evidence bordering on the genocide of the Chechen people. These judicial investigation materials are published in three printed books and are available on the Internet.

FREEDOM SOLD OR WAR BOUGHT? – REFLECTIONS BY APTI BATALOV (part 1)

I believe I am not mistaken when I say that one of the tragedies of the Chechen people originated on the day when Chechnya proclaimed itself an independent state. After choosing the first president, the Chechens naively believed that Russia would respect their choice. After all, Yeltsin said “take all the freedom you can swallow!” The Chechens did not know that “Swallowing freedom” they would regurgitate their blood.

The conquest of freedom

The Russians did not recognize the presidential elections held on October 27, 1991 in Chechnya. Rejecting any possibility of peaceful separation from Chechnya, the Kremlin has focused on the definitive solution of the Chechen “problem”. In planning actions against Chechen sovereignty, it was obvious that the Russian government would prioritize provocative and subversive activities, and this was evident from the growing activity of pro-Russian provocateurs on the territory of Chechnya. Funded and armed by Moscow, the leaders of the “anti-Dudaevites” began to form criminal groups under the cover of political slogans, calling themselves “opposition of the Dudaev regime”. In reality, the ideologues of this movement were full-time agents of the Russian special services and, following the instructions of the Lubyanka , they caused a civil war in the Chechens. Through these ” Mankurts ” [1], in the first half of the 90s of the twentieth century, Chechnya was transformed into a land of internal contrasts and social instability. Having already gained political independence from Moscow, many officials who held high positions in the state did what they could to discredit the idea of independence. With their actions they compromised the government, corrupted it, doing everything to make the Chechens repent of their choice. Every day, these people desecrated the idea of a free and sovereign state, and achieved many successes in this action, furthering the premises of the 1994/1996 Russo-Chechen War.

However, one detail had not been taken into consideration: the war imposed by the Kremlin would have ignited the genetic memory of the Chechens. All the people, with rare exceptions, took up arms and stood up to defend that choice. Evidently, after receiving the order to intensify their activities, the Russian special services agents began to increase their efforts to destabilize the political, economic and social situation throughout the Ichkeria territory. By sowing discord among the leaders of the state, creating an atmosphere of mutual distrust and enmity in the relations between yesterday’s comrades, the Russian mercenaries achieved the objectives set by Moscow. Instead of rallying around the president, in this hard and difficult time for the fate of the Chechen nation, and exercising their authority to defend and strengthen the authority of Ichkeria, the leaders of the country faced each other in the political arena with every sort of intrigue, against each other, using their credit only for speculative and populist purposes. After withdrawing troops from Ichkeria in 1996, the Russians invaded it with their agents. Terrible times came for Ichkeria, banditry assumed the proportions of a national catastrophe, kidnapping and the slave trade became the profession of a significant part of the former freedom fighters, lack of work and poverty swelled the ranks of criminals.

Heroes yesterday, enemies today

Thus there was no effective authority in Ichkeria. The comrades in arms of the President of yesterday, having had the opportunity to strengthen it, did not do so, but rather, having become politicians, they were the real antagonists of the President, doing everything to weaken his power. On every occasion, and under various pretexts, his authority was undermined: not a day passed without some “emergency” directed against the President. At that time I was convinced that these antagonists wanted to break Maskhadov psychologically. Imagine the state in which a person subjected to daily torture can be, every day more sophisticated and insidious. One fine day, the President collapsed… all this turmoil around the presidency drove the people to despair, their faith in authority and yesterday’s heroes disappeared. Social inequality, the absence of any guarantee of security, corrupt authorities at all levels, poverty and devastation: the Chechen people faced the 1999 war in these conditions … With an economic blockade, political and information isolation in place, the Chechen leadership he had no way of adequately preparing for Russian aggression.

The signs that the Russians were preparing a new war against Ichkeria appeared as early as February – March 1999. In February 1999, a demonstration of many thousands of people was held in support of the President’s policy in the city of Dzhokhar [formerly Grozny, NDR ]. The participants in the demonstration approved and supported in unison Maskhadov, the foreign and internal policy he pursued, and expressed the desire and willingness to take up arms to restore order in the country. Two or three Russian journalists were present at this gathering, being able to work without any restrictions. They assured me that the Russian media would report the demonstration, but not a single TV channel mentioned it. On the other hand, Russian public opinion began to be influenced by the idea that Maskhadov was a weak and indecisive person, that he had lost the support of the people, that power in Ichkeria was in the hands of the field commanders, that banditry and the slave trade flourished in Ichkeria. Obviously it would be wrong to deny these claims, which were partly true, but that the people did not support Maskhadov, or that he was weak, that was an absolute lie. The Chechen people had responded to the President’s appeal, and were willing to defend him. But the Russian media hid this fact from their audience. As for the field commanders, most of them obeyed without question the President and Commander the Chief of the Armed Forces.

But, as they say, no family is without monsters. On the occasion of the second anniversary of the signing of the Peace Treaty between Ichkeria and Russia on May 12 , 1997, well-organized celebrations were held in the city of Dzhokhar: events were held in the city center, horse races were held on the outskirts of the capital, with prizes in prize money, including “VAZ” 6 car models. It was a bright and festive day, during which the Ichkeria leadership showed all its desire for peace with Russia. Once again, Russian TV reporters worked on the event, as always without restrictions. And once again the media did not say a single word about the fact that similar celebrations were held in the city of Dzhokhar. All of this suggested that there would be no celebration the following year.


[1] Figuratively speaking, the word ” mankurt ” refers to people who have lost touch with their ethnic homeland , who have forgotten their kinship . For further information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mankurt

THE GENERAL OF NAUR – MEMORIES OF APTI BATALOV (PART IV)

Battle in Ilaskhan – Yurt

After leaving Argun, we moved to a wooded mountainous area in the Nozhai – Yurt district. Here we organized our base, well hidden in a gorge near the village of Shuani. On the afternoon of March 25, a messenger arrived at the base: we were ordered to go in force to the village of Novogrozny, today Oyskhara. When we arrived Maskhadov gave me a brief report on the situation: “The Russians have left Gudermes, and are moving in the direction of Novogrozny. They crushed our defenses. We have to delay them at least for a few hours, until we evacuate the hospital and the documents. I have no one else to send except your battalion. I ask you to detain the Russians as much as possible: there are many wounded in the hospital, if the Russians find them they will shoot them all. ” Then Maskhadov told me that on the eastern outskirts of Ilaskhan – Yurt a unit of militiamen from nearby was gathering and they would give us a hand.

There were few people with me, about thirty in all, because after the retreat from Argun many of the militiamen, cold and tired, had dispersed to the surrounding villages to recover their strength. We immediately set off towards Ilaskhan – Yurt and, having reached the goal, we reunited with 70 militia men. The Russians advanced on the wooded ridge overlooking the village, traveling in the direction of Novogrozny. We settled in positions previously equipped, and then later abandoned. Their conditions were not the best: due to the heavy rains of those days they were full of water, and we guarded the positions with mud up to our knees. We tried to drain them, but the water returned to fill them in a few hours, due to the damp soil.

Soon our presence was noticed by the Russians, who began bombing our trenches from their high positions. Using mortars and field artillery. In that bombing we suffered the wounding of three or four men. However , they did not proceed to an attack, allowing us to hold them back for many more hours. Having left in a hurry, we had brought neither food nor water with us: we spent the next night hungry and cold in our damp trenches, under constant enemy bombardment. We were so starved that, when we managed to get our hands on a heifer the next day, we ate its almost raw meat, but not before getting permission from a local clergyman.

March 29 , the first Russian patrol reached our trenches. We managed to repel the assault: the enemy lost two men and retreated quickly. From the uniforms and weapons found in the possession of the fallen Russians, we understood that we had a paratrooper unit in front of us. As soon as the Russians were back in their trenches the artillery began a pounding bombardment on our positions with mortars and 120 mm artillery, causing many injuries among our units. After a long preparatory bombardment, the infantry moved on to the attack, and we began the unhooking maneuvers: some of us took the wounded away, others retreated into the woods, or returned to their homes. Only five of us remained in position: Vakha from Chishka, Khavazhi from Naurskaya, Yusup from Alpatovo, Mammad from Naursk station and myself. When we finally managed to get away we were exhausted: I came out with chronic pneumonia, which would accompany me in the years to follow.

Combined Regiment Naursk

In April, if memory serves me well, on April 2, as he said, the head of the main headquarters of the armed forces of the CRI, General Maskhadov, came to my base. The Chief of Staff briefly introduced me to the latest events and changes on the lines of contact between us and the Russians: it was clear from his words that our situation was not good. Consequently he asked me to become subordinate to the commander of the Nozhai- Yurta leadership, Magomed Khambiev. The same day I went to Nozhai-Yurt, where I met the new commander. He assigned the battalion’s area of responsibility to a location not far from the village of Zamai-Yurt, southwest of this village. Once deployed, we dug trenches and equipped shooting points for the machine gun. Here at the base, we, in our Naur battalion, were joined by groups of militias from Gudermes and the Shelkovsky district, for a total of 200 people. As a result, our battalion became the “Combined Naur Regiment”. I was confirmed by Maskhadov himself as commander of this new unit.

The Regiment held the assigned position until the early days of 1995, fighting a war of position against Russian forces. These faced us mainly with artillery, throwing a hail of mortar rounds at us, and increasing the dose with incursions of combat helicopters MI – 42 and MI – 18. During this phase we mourned the death of one of us, Dzhamleila of Naurskaya , and the wounding of ten men. Finally, in the first days of June , we received the order to switch to guerrilla warfare.

VERSIONE ITALIANA

IL GENERALE DI NAUR – MEMORIE DI APTI BATALOV (PARTE 4)

Battaglia ad Ilaskhan – Yurt

Dopo aver lasciato Argun, ci trasferimmo in una zona montuosa coperta di boschi, nel distretto di Nozhai – Yurt. Qui organizzammo la nostra base, ben nascosta in una gola vicino al villaggio di Shuani. Nel pomeriggio del 25 Marzo giunse alla base un messaggero: ci era ordinato di dirigerci in forze al villaggio di Novogrozny, oggi Oyskhara. Quando arrivammo Maskhadov mi fece un breve rapporto sulla situazione: “I russi hanno lasciato Gudermes, e si stanno muovendo in direzione di Novogrozny. Hanno schiacciato le nostre difese. Dobbiamo ritardarli almeno per qualche ora, finchè non evacuiamo l’ospedale ed i documenti. Non ho nessun altro da inviare, tranne il tuo battaglione. Ti chiedo di trattenere i russi il più possibile: ci sono molti feriti nell’ospedale, se i russi li trovano li fucileranno tutti.” Poi Maskhadov mi disse che alla periferia orientale di Ilaskhan – Yurt si stava radunando un reparto di miliziani provenienti dalle vicinanze, i quali ci avrebbero dato man forte.

Insieme a me c’erano poche persone, una trentina in tutto, perché dopo la ritirata da Argun molti dei miliziani, infreddoliti e stanchi, si erano dispersi nei villaggi circostanti per recuperare le forze. Ci mettemmo subito in marcia verso Ilaskhan  – Yurt e, raggiunto l’obiettivo, ci ricongiungemmo con 70 uomini della milizia. I russi avanzavano sulla cresta boscosa che dominava il villaggio, viaggiando in direzione di Novogrozny. Ci sistemammo in posizioni precedentemente attrezzate, e poi successivamente abbandonate. Le loro condizioni non erano delle migliori: a causa delle forti piogge di quei giorni erano piene d’acqua, e presidiavamo le posizioni con il fango fino alle ginocchia. Cercavamo di drenarle, ma l’acqua tornava a riempirle in poche ore, a causa del terreno umido.

Ben presto la nostra presenza fu notata dai russi, i quali iniziarono a bombardare le nostre trincee dalle loro posizioni elevate. Usando mortai ed artiglieria da campagna. In quel bombardamento patimmo il ferimento di tre o quattro uomini. Tuttavia non procedettero ad un attacco, permettendoci di trattenerli ancora per molte ore. Essendo partiti in fretta e furia, non avevamo portato con noi né cibo né acqua: trascorremmo la notte successiva affamati ed infreddoliti nelle nostre trincee umide, sotto il costante bombardamento nemico. Eravamo così provati dalla fame che, quando il giorno dopo riuscimmo a mettere le mani su una giovenca, ne mangiammo la carne quasi cruda, ma non prima di aver avuto il permesso da un religioso locale.

A mezzogiorno del 29 Marzo la prima pattuglia russa raggiunse le nostre trincee. Riuscimmo a respingere l’assalto: il nemico perse due uomini e si ritirò velocemente. Dalle divise e dalle armi trovate in possesso dei russi caduti capimmo di avere davanti un reparto di paracadutisti.  Non appena i russi furono rientrati nelle loro trincee l’artiglieria iniziò un bombardamento martellante sulle nostre posizioni con mortai ed artiglieria da 120 mm, provocando molti ferimenti tra le nostre unità. Dopo un lungo bombardamento preparatorio, la fanteria passò all’attacco, e noi iniziammo le manovre di sganciamento: alcuni di noi portarono via i feriti, altri si ritirarono tra i boschi, o tornarono alle loro case. In posizione rimanemmo soltanto in cinque: Vakha da Chishka, Khavazhi da Naurskaya, Yusup da Alpatovo, Mammad dalla stazione di Naursk ed io. Quando finalmente riuscimmo ad allontanarci eravamo esausti: io ne uscii con una polmonite cronica, che mi avrebbe accompagnato negli anni a seguire.

Reggimento Combinato Naursk

Ad aprile, se la memoria mi serve bene, il due aprile, come ha detto, il capo del quartier generale principale delle forze armate della CRI, il generale Maskhadov, è venuto alla mia base. Il capo di stato maggiore mi ha brevemente presentato gli ultimi eventi e i cambiamenti sulle linee di contatto tra noi e i russi: era chiaro dalle sue parole che la  nostra situazione non era buona. Di conseguenza mi chiese di diventare subordinato al comandante di la direzione Nozhai-Yurta,  Magomed Khambiev. Lo stesso giorno mi recai a Nozhai-Yurt, dove incontrai il nuovo comandante. Egli assegnò l’area di responsabilità del battaglione ad una posizione non lontana dal villaggio di Zamai-Yurt, a sud-ovest di questo villaggio. Una volta schierati, abbiamo scavato trincee e attrezzato punti di tiro per la mitragliatrice. Qui alla base, noi, nel nostro battaglione Naur, siamo stati raggiunti da gruppi di milizie di Gudermes e del distretto di Shelkovsky, per un totale di 200 persone. Di conseguenza, il nostro battaglione divenne il “Reggimento Combinato Naur”. Fui confermato dallo stesso Maskhadov comandante di questa nuova unità.

Il Reggimento tenne la posizione assegnata fino ai primi di giorni del 1995, combattendo una guerra di posizione contro le forze russe. Queste ci affrontavano principalmente con l’artiglieria, lanciandoci contro una grandine di colpi di mortaio, e rincarando la dose con incursioni di elicotteri da combattimento MI – 42 e MI – 18. Durante questa fase piangemmo la morte di uno di noi, Dzhamleila di Naurskaya, ed il ferimento di dieci uomini. Nei primi giorni di Giugno, infine, ricevemmo l’ordine di passare alla guerra partigiana.

THE GENERAL OF NAUR: MEMORIES OF APTI BATALOV (Part III)

Defending Grozny

When the federal forces reached Grozny, my men and I were in Gudermes, where we had quartered to form an organized unit made up entirely of men from the Naur District . On January 4th , a runner sent by Maskhadov was placed in our command post. He gave me the order to converge on our capital with all the men at my disposal. Once in the city, I met a young volunteer, who made himself available to organize our group and put it in coordination with the other fighting units. It is called Turpal Ali Atgeriev. In conversation with him, I learned that he had taken part in the war in Abkhazia and that he had some fighting experience. There was not a single war veteran among us, starting with me: I was in desperate need of someone with combat experience. For this I asked Atgiriev to become my deputy, and he accepted my proposal. Since he didn’t have a weapon, I handed him an RPK-74 machine gun. Someone criticized my decision, accusing me of having appointed a stranger as my deputy. I was not interested in this gossip and intrigue, I was worried about only one thing itself: saving lives and at the same time beating the enemy.

We were deployed in defense of the Pedagogical Institute. A regiment of Russian marines had targeted the building: if this had been taken, it would have been possible to easily reach Maskhadov’s headquarters, which was literally fifty meters from our position, under the Presidential Palace. The Russians tried to break through our defenses almost every day, until January 19 , 1994, but without success. In these attacks they lost many soldiers, whose corpses remained in the middle of the road, in no man’s land, prey to stray dogs. We tried to remove them, to save their bodies, but without a respite we could not have prevented them from being eaten. Several times, during the fighting, our command and the Russian one reached an agreement for a 48-hour truce, precisely to clean the streets of the corpses of Russian soldiers. During these truces we talked to the Russian patrols stationed on the side streets. I remember one of these conversations with a Russian captain, to whom I had thrown a pack of cigarettes: Guys he said, quit, you will not win, because you are not fighting the police, but the army. His voice was not arrogant, he was a simple Russian peasant. That battle was also difficult because to supply our armories we had to capture weapons and ammunition from the Russians. In every disabled armored transport vehicle we found a heap of weapons, cartridges and grenades, which we looted. Later the Russians became more careful, and we didn’t find much in their means. On the other hand, their vehicles were stuffed with all sorts of carpets, dishes and other goods looted from the population.

January 19 , when it became clear that the defense of the Pedagogical Institute would no longer slow down the fall of the Presidential Palace, we withdrew. I was ordered to organize the defense of the Trampark area , and we occupied positions on Novya Street Buachidze . Trampark changed hands several times, and there were fierce battles until February 7th . Right in via Novya Buachidze suffered a shock from a tank bullet which, entering the window of the room where I was with some of my men, hit two of them in full, killing them. This shock still undermines my health. Finally, on the evening of February 7 , a messenger from Maskhadov handed me a note in which I was ordered to leave the position, join Basayev in Chernorechie and leave the city. I should have assumed the defense in the parking area in Via 8 Marzo, where the departments were concentrating to prepare for the exit from the city. Once there we counted all those present: also considering the staff of the Headquarters, we were 320 men. Obviously some departments were not present: detached units fought in other areas of the city, and besides them there were the so-called “Indians”, armed gangs who did not obey anyone, they fought when it was favorable gold and along the way they plundered everything that they could find. When Maskhadov lined up us in the square, he told us that our descendants would be proud of us, that the victory would be ours, that we were leaving Grozny only to return one day. The night between 7 and 8 Fenbbraio we left the capital.

The Naursk Battalion

It was after the retreat from Grozny that my unit, still an amalgam of more or less organized groups, began to become a real tactical unit. This same process was also taking place in the other units that had formed spontaneously at the beginning of the war. Moreover, in the Chechen resistance there were no military units and formations in the classical sense of the term: “battalions”, “regiments” and “fronts” were symbolic terms that did not correspond to a battle order in the classical sense. For example, what was called the “Argun Regiment” was an association of several groups, often poorly armed, made up of a variable number of people, each of which replied to its own commander. The members of these units, all volunteers, could leave at any time, there was no precise chain of command.

Our team spirit had already been forged in the battles we had fought together, and which unfortunately had forced us to count the first fallen. The first of our men to die for the defense of Chechnya was Beshir Turluev , who fell at the Ishcherskaya Checkpoint in December 1994. Since then, other young Chechens had sacrificed their lives for their homeland. Among those who remained alive, and who fought more assiduously with me, a group of “veterans” began to form, who by character or competence acquired the role of “informal officers”. Thus, for example, a 4th year student of a medical institute, whose name was Ruslan, became the head of the medical unit, while Sheikh Khavazhi , from the village of Naurskaya , became the head of logistics. The latter was in charge of keeping in touch with the Naur region , from which the supplies for our unit came. The inhabitants collected the food intended for our livelihood and delivered it to us via a KAMAZ truck, driven by Umar, from the village of Savelieva, and his companion Alkhazur . Sometimes money was also collected, usually a small amount, which was scrupulously recorded and distributed among the men. For the needs of the battalion, for the entire period of the 1994-1996 war, I, from the central command, did not receive more than 3 thousand dollars.

Defending Argun

After we had withdrawn from Grozny, Maskhadov ordered us to fall back on Argun, to help defend the city. We quartered ourselves in the city hospital, now empty and unused. The commander of the stronghold was Khunkarpasha Israpilov, and the commander of the largest unit, the so-called “Combined Regiment”, was Aslambek Ismailov. We were deployed in the sector of the so-called “Indian village”, a front of about 350 meters along the Argun River. On our left were the so-called “Black Wolves”, characterized by wearing very dark jeans. On the other side were Alaudi ‘s men Khamzatov , guard posts on the main bridge over the Argun. In front of us was a Russian paratrooper unit. We learned that we were facing special forces from a Russian soldier whom we captured when, with his squad, he attempted a reconnaissance close to our lines. At that juncture, as soon as the other side learned that their group had been identified and attacked, the Moscow artillery launched a massive bombing on our positions, during which two of our militiamen fell: Daud, coming from the village of Kalinovsky and Rizvan , from Naurskaya . To scare us, the Russians played Vladimir Vysotsky ‘s “Hunting for Wolves” at very high volume . We responded with “Freedom or Death”. The supply of the militias in the city of Argun, as well as in Grozny, was very scarce, there was a severe shortage of ammunition, there was a catastrophic lack of machine gun cartridges, RPG-7 grenade launcher shells and only dressing bandages they were more or less in abundance among the drugs.

On the morning of March 20, the Russians began testing our defenses along the entire line of contact, simulating a force attack from our side. In reality, the main attack took place, surprisingly, at the Moskovsky state farm . We did not expect the enemy to break in from that side, and after a fierce battle during which we lost many men (including the commander of the Melkhu – Khe militia , whose name was Isa and a brave, young Lithuanian named Nicholas) we had to leave the city, to retreat to the wooded region of Nozhai – Yurt. In the defense of Argun, Abuezid , from the village of Naurskaya , Umar, Mekenskaya , Muslim, Nikolaevskaya also fell , while another ten of us were wounded. We left Argun in the night between 21st and 22nd March 1995.

IL TRADIMENTO CHE NON CI FU – L’OPERAZIONE “SCHAMIL” (I Parte)

Quando, nel Febbraio del 1944, Stalin decretò la deportazione di massa dei Ceceni in Asia centrale, egli motivò la terribile “punizione” con la supposta collaborazione dei Ceceni con le forze armate germaniche. Tale collaborazione sarebbe avvenuta, secondo la versione ufficiale, nel corso del 1942, in concomitanza con un’azione di intelligence e sabotaggio compiuta dalla Wehrmacht, chiamata in codice “Operazione Schamil”. Il marchio dell’infamia, gettato su tutti i ceceni dalla teoria del “tradimento”, avrebbe condizionato l’esistenza di un intero popolo il quale, ridotto a paria nel consesso delle nazioni che abitavano l’impero sovietico, fu costretto ad accettare una frustrante discriminazione sociale, economica e politica. Questa condizione fu uno tra i detonatori del desiderio di rivalsa che pervase i ceceni alla fine degli anni ’80, e alimentò quel desiderio di libertà che poi si concretizzò con l’indipendenza nel 1991.

Oggi in Russia si è accettata l’idea che la deportazione del 1944 fu un crimine terribile. Eppure rimane ben radicata dell’opinione pubblica l’idea che questo tradimento dei ceceni si sarebbe realmente consumato, e che pertanto vi sia una “colpa” ancestrale che i Vaynakh dovrebbero “espiare” di fronte alla madrepatria. Tralasciando il fatto che molti ceceni non considerano affatto la Russia la loro casa, e che quindi non si sentirebbero affatto dei “traditori” di una patria che non riconoscono, il fatto è che questa “colpa” non è affatto certa. Anzi, è piuttosto chiaro, dalle evidenze storiche, che la maggior parte dei ceceni combattè con onore nelle file dell’Armata Rossa, e che la popolazione civile non solidarizzò con i tedeschi più di quanto non lo fecero le altre nazioni sottoposte al giogo di Stalin.

Recentemente Pieter Van Huis, ricercatore dell’Università di Leida, nei Paesi Bassi, ha pubblicato una tesi dal titolo Banditi di montagna e fuorilegge della foresta. Ceceni e Ingusce sotto il dominio sovietico nel 1918-1944. Lo studioso dedica un capitolo proprio alla celebre “Operazione Schamil”: attingendo alle fonti documentali disponibili presso gli archivi della Wehmacht e dell’NKVD, ha saputo ricostruire la genesi e lo svolgimento di questa azione. Riepiloghiamo in sintesi quanto è emerso dagli studi di Van Huis, a loro volta riportati da Anastasia Kirilenko sul sito del Nodo Caucasico: https://www.kavkaz-uzel.eu/

I RAPPORTI LANGE

Le prime fonti cui fa riferimento Van Huis sono tre rapporti operativi, due firmati dal Tenente Maggiore Erhard Lange ed uno dal volontario osseto Boris Tsagolov. Tutte e tre le fonti, sebbene differenti nello stile, concordano sul fatto che l’operazione fu un sostanziale fallimento principalmente a causa della pronta reazione delle unità dell’NKVD, le quali procedettero a punire i residenti che davano ospitalità al nemico bruciando le loro case, o applicando punizioni collettive alle comunità che non si opposero attivamente al suo passaggio. Tutti e tre i rapporti, in ogni caso, concordano sul fatto che ad eccezione di alcune bande di irregolari, peraltro già attive prima dell’invasione, non fornirono un supporto sufficiente al buon esito dell’operazione.

Il primo di questi rapporti fu inviato da Ehrard Lange il 5 Gennaio 1943. In esso si riepiloga che l’Operazione Schamil ebbe inizio il 25 Agosto 1942, quando un aereo della Luftwaffe decollato da Armavir paracadutò 11 tedeschi e 19 volontari caucasici nei pressi di Chishki e di Dachu – Barzoi, a circa 30 kilometri da Grozny. Il cielo era sgombro, e la luce della luna illuminò fin da subito i paracadutisti, i quali furono presi di mira dal nemico. La maggior parte delle armi e dell’equipaggiamento fu quindi frettolosamente abbandonato, e ci vollero alcuni giorni prima che il gruppo potesse ricompattarsi, non prima di aver accertato alcune perdite e diserzioni. Il gruppo, ridotto a 22 uomini, tentò di racimolare qualche arma da fuoco sequestrandola agli abitanti dei villaggi vicini, mentre tentava di guadagnare un rifugio sicuro. Tuttavia, essendo stati notati fin dal loro arrivo, gli uomini del commando divennero da subito oggetto di una spietata caccia da parte dell’NKVD, che giunse a mobilitare addirittura 2.000 effettivi per stanarli. Lange tentò quindi di prendere contatto con i ribelli locali, arroccati sulle montagne, cercando di riunirli in un’unica banda organizzata, e di aggiungere a questa massa critica un contingente di 400 ribelli georgiani. Il piano, tuttavia, non riuscì a causa del fatto che il 24 Settembre 1942 l’NKVD intercettò Lange, costringendolo ad aprirsi una via di fuga con la forza. I sopravvissuti raggiunsero Kharsenoy, ma qui furono nuovamente intercettati e costretti a combattere. Dopo aver perduto altri uomini, Lange decise di abortire la missione. Dopo aver abbandonato le divise ed indossato abiti civili, riuscì a spacciare i resti del suo gruppo (cinque tedeschi e quattro caucasici) per una banda di banditi Cabardini, finché non riuscì ad ottenere la collaborazione di alcuni residenti locali, i quali accettarono di aiutarlo a patto i membri della banda fossero divisi e distribuiti secondo le loro volontà. Non potendo fare altro, Lange acconsentì. Lui e i suoi uomini rimasero nascosti fino al 9 Dicembre successivo, quando appresero che l’armata rossa aveva intercettato e distrutto la maggior parte dei ribelli operanti in Cecenia. Il giorno successivo Lange raccolse i suoi, e li portò oltre la linea del fronte. Rientrato alla base, l’ufficiale compilò una memoria nella quale indicò una lista di nomi di “103 persone assolutamente affidabili, che potrebbero fungere da guide”.

Successivamente, il 23 Aprile 1943, Lange depositò un secondo rapporto, nel quale specificava maggiormente lo scopo della sua missione: mettere in atto operazioni militari per ostacolare la ritirata nemica lungo la direttrice Grozny – Botlikh. Il compito, si specificava, non era stato portato a termine a causa del fatto che la maggior parte delle armi era andato perduto durante l’atterraggio, ma anche per via della scarsa collaborazione dei residenti locali. Secondo questo rapporto, una volta constatata la dispersione del “Gruppo Lange”, il comando tedesco aveva inviato una seconda unità, chiamata “Gruppo Rekert” a cercare di recuperare i dispersi. Questo secondo drappello, tuttavia, era stato sbaragliato ed i suoi componenti risultavano scomparsi. Rispetto al suo rapporto con i civili, Lange precisa che il gruppo era nelle mani della popolazione civile e correva quotidianamente il rischio di un tradimento da parte loro, e che soltanto dopo lunghe discussioni il commando riuscì a liberarsi da questa tutela. Infine, il resoconto specificava anche l’obiettivo secondario seguito da Lange una volta che quello principale (il sabotaggio) si rivelò irraggiungibile: Verificare la veridicità dei rapporti al Fuhrer secondo i quali ceceni e ingusci sarebbero particolarmente coraggiosi nella lotta contro i bolscevichi e, nel caso, fornire loro supporto logistico ed armi per proseguire la guerriglia. Per raggiungere questo secondo obiettivo Lang avrebbe dovuto passare alcune settimane in Cecenia, confidando nello spirito di ospitalità dei residenti locali. Egli sapeva che per un ceceno l’ospitalità è sacra. Nel rapporto riferisce, infatti: le regole locali sull’ospitalità richiedono di proteggere la vita di un ospite anche a costo della propria. Consci di questo, i tedeschi non risparmiarono ai ceceni veri e propri ricatti morali, minacciando di far sapere a tutti del disonore gettato sulla famiglia e sul Teip da persone che non accettavano di ospitarli e di collaborare con loro.

Se ottenere l’ospitalità dei ceceni sembrava piuttosto facile, molto più difficile risultò garantirsi la loro alleanza nel costituire un movimento di resistenza antisovietica. Sempre citando Lange:  I residenti locali non sono interessati a nulla, tranne che al destino del loro villaggio, nel quale vorrebbero vivere come contadini liberi. Essi non hanno alcun rispetto per il tempo, per lo spazio, né per il rispetto degli accordi presi. […] Tutto questo crea pessimi requisiti per una rivolta. Citando un evento accaduto al Gruppo Reckert, Lange ricorda che dopo aver ricevuto le armi, gli uomini sono tornati in fretta ai loro villaggi. A conclusione del suo rapporto, Lange consigliava di non investire uomini e mezzi in questa operazione, giacchè la popolazione locale non avrebbe combattuto per la Germania, ma al massimo per liberarsi delle fattorie collettive e riappropriarsi della terra.

ENGLISH VERSION


THE BETRAYAL THAT DID NOT HAPPEN – OPERATION “SCHAMIL” (Part I)

When, in February 1944, Stalin decreed the mass deportation of the Chechens to Central Asia, he motivated the terrible "punishment" with the alleged collaboration of the Chechens with the Germanic armed forces. According to the official version, this collaboration took place during 1942, in conjunction with an intelligence and sabotage action carried out by the Wehrmacht, codenamed "Operation Schamil". The stigma thrown on all Chechens by the theory of "betrayal", would have conditioned the existence of an entire people who, reduced to pariah in the assembly of nations that inhabited the Soviet empire, was forced to accept a frustrating social, economic and political discrimination. This condition was one of the detonators of the desire for revenge that pervaded the Chechens in the late 1980s, and fueled that desire for freedom which then materialized with independence in 1991.

Today in Russia it is accepted that the 1944 deportation was a terrible crime. Yet public opinion remains firmly rooted in the idea that this betrayal of the Chechens would actually be consummated, and that therefore there is an ancestral "guilt" that the Vaynakhs should "atone" in the face of the motherland. Leaving aside the fact that many Chechens do not consider Russia their home at all, and therefore would not at all feel like "traitors" to a homeland they do not recognize, the fact is that this "fault" is by no means certain. Indeed, it is quite clear from the historical evidence that most Chechens fought with honor in the ranks of the Red Army, and that the civilian population did not sympathize with the Germans any more than did other nations under Stalin's yoke. .

Pieter Van Huis, a researcher at the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, recently published a thesis entitled Mountain Bandits and Forest Outlaws. Chechens and Ingush under Soviet rule in 1918-1944. The scholar dedicates a chapter to the famous "Operation Schamil": drawing on the documentary sources available in the Wehmacht and NKVD archives, he was able to reconstruct the genesis and development of this action. We summarize in summary what emerged from the studies of Van Huis, in turn reported by Anastasia Kirilenko on the Caucasian Node website: https://www.kavkaz-uzel.eu/
THE LANGE REPORTS

The first sources to which Van Huis refers are three operational reports, two signed by Lieutenant Major Erhard Lange and one by the Ossetian volunteer Boris Tsagolov. All three sources, although different in style, agree that the operation was a substantial failure mainly due to the prompt reaction of the NKVD units, which proceeded to punish the residents who housed the enemy by burning their homes. , or by applying collective punishment to communities that did not actively oppose its passage. All three reports, in any case, agree that with the exception of some bands of illegal immigrants, which were already active before the invasion, they did not provide sufficient support for the success of the operation.
The first of these reports was sent by Ehrard Lange on January 5, 1943. It summarizes that Operation Schamil began on August 25, 1942, when a Luftwaffe plane taken off from Armavir parachuted 11 Germans and 19 Caucasian volunteers near Chishki. and Dachu - Barzoi, about 30 kilometers from Grozny. The sky was clear, and the light of the moon immediately illuminated the paratroopers, who were targeted by the enemy. Most of the weapons and equipment were therefore hastily abandoned, and it took a few days before the group could regroup, not before having ascertained some losses and desertions. The group, reduced to 22 men, attempted to scrape together some firearms by seizing them from nearby villagers, while trying to gain a safe haven. However, having been noticed since their arrival, the men of the commando immediately became the object of a merciless hunt by the NKVD, which even mobilized 2,000 troops to track them down. Lange then attempted to make contact with the local rebels, perched in the mountains, trying to unite them in a single organized band, and to add a contingent of 400 Georgian rebels to this critical mass. The plan, however, failed due to the fact that on September 24, 1942, the NKVD intercepted Lange, forcing him to forcibly open an escape route. The survivors reached Kharsenoy, but here they were again intercepted and forced to fight. After losing other men, Lange decided to abort the mission. After abandoning his uniforms and wearing civilian clothes, he managed to pass off the remains of his group (five Germans and four Caucasians) as a band of Cabardini bandits, until he succeeded in obtaining the collaboration of some local residents, who agreed to help him provided the members of the gang were divided and distributed according to their will. Unable to do anything else, Lange agreed. He and his men remained in hiding until the following December 9, when they learned that the Red Army had intercepted and destroyed most of the rebels operating in Chechnya. The next day Lange gathered his own, and carried them over the front line. Returning to the base, the officer compiled a memo in which he indicated a list of names of "103 absolutely reliable people, who could serve as guides".
Subsequently, on April 23, 1943, Lange filed a second report, in which he further specified the purpose of his mission: to carry out military operations to obstruct the enemy retreat along the Grozny - Botlikh route. The task, it was specified, had not been completed due to the fact that most of the weapons had been lost during landing, but also due to the lack of cooperation from local residents. According to this report, once the dispersion of the "Lange Group" was ascertained, the German command had sent a second unit, called the "Rekert Group" to try to recover the missing. This second squad, however, had been defeated and its members had disappeared. With respect to his relationship with civilians, Lange specifies that the group was in the hands of the civilian population and daily ran the risk of betrayal on their part, and that only after long discussions did the commandos manage to free themselves from this protection. Finally, the report also specified the secondary objective followed by Lange once the main one (sabotage) proved unattainable: Verifying the veracity of the reports to the Fuhrer according to which Chechens and Ingush are particularly courageous in the fight against the Bolsheviks and, in the case, provide them with logistical support and weapons to continue the guerrilla warfare. To achieve this second goal, Lang would have had to spend a few weeks in Chechnya, trusting in the spirit of hospitality of the local residents. He knew that hospitality is sacred to a Chechen. In fact, in the report he reports: the local rules on hospitality require you to protect the life of a guest even at the cost of your own. Aware of this, the Germans did not spare the Chechens real moral blackmail, threatening to let everyone know of the dishonor thrown on the family and on the Teip by people who did not accept to host them and to collaborate with them.
While obtaining the hospitality of the Chechens seemed easy enough, it was much more difficult to secure their alliance in forming an anti-Soviet resistance movement. Again quoting Lange: Local residents are not interested in anything except the fate of their village, in which they would like to live as free farmers. They have no respect for time, space, or compliance with the agreements made. […] All this creates bad conditions for a riot. Citing an event that happened to the Reckert Group, Lange recalls that after receiving the weapons, the men quickly returned to their villages. At the end of his report, Lange advised not to invest men and means in this operation, since the local population would not fight for Germany, but at most to get rid of the collective farms and regain possession of the land.

“There are forces more dangerous than any tank!” Dudaev’s first speech

On November 23, 1990, the first session (and also the only one with this name) of the Chechen National Congress took place. At the end of this event, Air Force General Dzhokhar Dudaev appeared to the general Chechen public for the first time. We will not dwell on the origins of the congress, nor on the figure of Dudaev but on the words he uttered. His intervention came at the end of the work of the congress, when the delegates had already decided to vote a Declaration of Sovereignty of the Chechen Republic, and to transform the congress into a permanent political platform. We publish Dudaev’s words first of all because the full text of the speech has never been translated from Russian, and it constitutes a fundamental historical source for understanding not only the General’s political parable, but also for framing the entire evolution of Chechen nationalism.

The original Dudaev’s speech

Dear brothers and sisters. Dear comrades, our dear guests.


I sincerely congratulate you and myself on the first hours and first day of citizenship of a sovereign state. The declaration has been adopted and I am fully convinced that even if someone has the idea to object, he will be a potential enemy of our people.


The delegates of the congress took on the extraordinary responsibility of being representatives of the people. The announcement itself is not that difficult. But there is a wise saying among the people: “don’t take out the dagger unnecessarily, if you take it out, use it”.


The dagger is unsheathed. Now we need to think about how to equip a sovereign state. This is an extremely delicate and complex process. I would like to warn my compatriots that the most dangerous period regarding possible provocation, conditioning of the minds of individuals, which can lead to bloodshed, is coming right now. There are sufficient forces for this. The young man who spoke earlier recalled the danger of an attack with tanks. The tank is vulnerable. It is clearly visible, you can lie under it with and detonate it with grenades. There are forces more dangerous than any tank, plane, and any weapon. Seven-story buildings (KGB) located on the next street. Even if one person sits in each of their offices, one can imagine what forces there are for this republic. Not a single autonomous republic has such potential, even just in terms of building. Probably down below too, a couple of floors underground.

The KGB building in Grozny before the war


No matter how difficult it is to recognize and assume this responsibility: if the sovereign republic does not have its own protection forces, guarantors of the republic’s security, and a Ministry of the Interior, if it is not willing to mobilize, to create its own formations, a sovereign republic, at the present stage, does not exist.


This confirms the course of events, the ongoing struggle in all regions. And as has been said here, now we must act and not wait for outside help. If we present a bill, my personal belief is that Russia should stay closer. Where is the evolved parliament, where are the capable forces, the forces of democracy and the master generator of perestroika. It is necessary to present to the allied department all the reports we are talking about for the damage suffered by our little and poor peoples on this earth.


The well-being that today is relatively available in the republic compared to other regions and is ensured, first of all, by the flexibility of the management, to which due must be recognized, and no less by the wisdom of the people. A beautiful land, one of the most fertile corners, nature always gives birth to beautiful people: soul, body, spirit, will, character, all positive natural qualities. Of which we talk a lot …


I asked my compatriots not to turn the glory of the past on them, the best people of Russia and all countries of the world spoke of this glory. When we talk about it ourselves, it means that the spiritual potential of the present generation has run out.

Dudaev at the first session of the Chechen National Congress


It would seem …


So, I have so many proposals, that (if the Organizing Committee of the Congress is interested), and with full conviction (if until now there were doubts about the possibility of maintaining democracy, the creation of a rule of law), then young people of the Organizing Committee, which in the most difficult conditions managed to convene the People’s Congress (the highest organization of our time), then there is the potential of young people, there is the strength of young people.


The rest of the proposals on Parliament, if they are of interest to the Management and the Organizing Committee, I will send them in writing.
Thanks for your attention, good luck and on.

“Ci sono forze più pericolose di qualsiasi carro armato!” Il primo discorso di Dudaev

Il 23 Novembre 1990 si svolse la prima sessione (e anche l’unica con questo nome) del Congresso Nazionale Ceceno. Al termine di questo evento apparve al grande pubblico ceceno, per la prima volta, il Generale dell’Aviazione Dzhokhar Dudaev. Non ci dilungheremo sulle origini del congresso, né sulla figura di Dudaev quanto sulle parole che egli proferì. Il suo intervento giunse alla fine dei lavori del congresso, quando i delegati avevano già stabilito di votare una Dichiarazione di Sovranità della Repubblica Cecena, e di trasformare il congresso in una piattaforma politica permanente. Pubblichiamo le parole di Dudaev prima di tutto perché il testo integrale del discorso non è mai stato tradotto dal russo, e costituisce una fonte storica fondamentale per capire non soltanto la parabola politica del Generale, ma anche per inquadrare l’evoluzione intera del nazionalismo ceceno.

Il discorso di Dudaev al Congresso in lingua originale

Cari fratelli e sorelle. Cari compagni, nostri cari ospiti.

Mi congratulo sinceramente con voi e con me stesso per le prime ore e il primo giorno di cittadinanza di uno stato sovrano. La dichiarazione è stata adottata e sono pienamente convinto che anche se qualcuno avrà l’idea di opporsi, sarà un potenziale nemico del nostro popolo.

I delegati del congresso si sono assunti la straordinaria responsabilità di essere rappresentanti del popolo. L’annuncio di per sè non è così difficile. Ma c’è un detto saggio tra la gente: “non tirare fuori il pugnale senza bisogno, se lo tiri fuori, usalo”.

Il pugnale è sguainato. Ora dobbiamo pensare a come attrezzare uno stato sovrano. Questo è un processo estremamente delicato e complesso. Vorrei avvertire i miei compatrioti che il periodo più pericoloso riguardo a possibili provocazioni, condizionamento delle menti degli individui, che può portare allo spargimento di sangue, sta arrivando proprio ora. Ci sono forze sufficienti per questo. Il giovane che ha parlato prima ha rammentato il pericolo di un’aggressione con i carri armati. Il carro armato è vulnerabile. È ben visibile, puoi sdraiartici sotto con e farlo esplodere con le granate. Ci sono forze più pericolose di qualsiasi carro armato, aereo e qualsiasi arma. Edifici a sette piani (KGB) che si trovano sulla strada successiva. Anche se una persona siede in ogni loro ufficio, si può immaginare quali forze ci siano per questa repubblica. Non una sola repubblica autonoma ha un tale potenziale, anche solo in termini di edificio. Probabilmente anche in basso, un paio di piani sottoterra.

Non importa quanto sia difficile riconoscere e assumersi tale responsabilità: se la repubblica sovrana non avrà le sue forze di protezione, garanti della sicurezza della repubblica, e un Ministero dell’Interno, se non sarà nella disponibilità di effettuare una mobilitazione, di creare le proprie formazioni, una repubblica sovrana, nella fase attuale, non esiste.

Questo conferma il corso degli eventi, la lotta in corso in tutte le regioni. E come è stato detto qui, ora bisogna agire e non aspettare l’aiuto dall’esterno. Se presentiamo un disegno di legge, la mia personale convinzione è che la Russia dovrebbe restare più vicina. Dov’è il parlamento evoluto, dove sono le forze capaci, le forze della democrazia e il maestro generatore della perestrojka. E’ necessario presentare al dipartimento alleato tutti i resoconti di cui stiamo parlando per i danni che hanno subito i nostri piccoli e poveri popoli su questa terra.

L’edificio del KGB a Grozny prima della guerra

Il benessere che oggi è relativamente disponibile nella repubblica rispetto ad altre regioni ed è assicurato, in primo luogo, dalla flessibilità della dirigenza, a cui bisogna riconoscere il dovuto, e non meno dalla saggezza del popolo. Una terra bellissima, uno degli angoli più fertili, la natura fa nascere sempre belle persone: anima, corpo, spirito, volontà, carattere, tutte qualità naturali positive. Delle quali si parla molto…

Ho chiesto ai miei compatrioti di non rivolgere su di loro la gloria del passato, le migliori persone della Russia e di tutti i paesi del mondo hanno parlato di questa gloria. Quando noi stessi ne parliamo, significa che il potenziale spirituale della generazione attuale si è esaurito.

Sembrerebbe…

Quindi, ho tante proposte, che (se interessa il Comitato Organizzatore del Congresso), e con piena convinzione (se fino ad ora c’erano dubbi sulla possibilità di mantenere la democrazia, la creazione di uno Stato di diritto), allora giovani persone del Comitato Organizzatore, che nelle condizioni più difficili sono riuscite a convocare il Congresso del Popolo (l’organizzazione più alta del nostro tempo), poi c’è il potenziale dei giovani, c’è la forza dei giovani.

Il resto delle proposte sul Parlamento, se interessano alla Direzione e al Comitato Organizzatore, le manderò per iscritto.

Grazie per l’attenzione, buona fortuna e avanti.

Dudaev al Congresso del 1990

LA PACE PRECARIA – Il trattato di pace Russo – Ceceno

Il 12 Maggio 1997 la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria e la Federazione Russa firmarono un trattato di pace con il quale intendevano porre fine alla Prima Guerra Russo – Cecena. Nonostante che in esso la Russia riconoscesse De Jure la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria, le clausole contenute nell’accordo furono interpretate in maniera assai differente dalle due parti. Il diverso approccio tenuto da Mosca e da Grozny rispetto al Trattato di Pace avrebbe impedito la risoluzione pacifica del conflitto, e creato le premesse per una nuova guerra.

Il testo del trattato in inglese e in russo

IL TRATTATO DI MOSCA

Il 12 Maggio1997 la delegazione cecena, composta da Maskhadov, Ugudov e Zakayev raggiunse Mosca, dove procedette alla firma solenne del Trattato di Pace tra la Federazione Russa e la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria. La firma del Trattato fu un evento epocale: per la prima volta in quattrocento anni di guerre e tensioni il governo di Mosca e quello di Grozny si promettevano ufficialmente la pace. Vennero firmati due documenti: il primo si intitolava “Trattato di Pace e Principi di Relazione tra la Federazione Russa e la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria”, il secondo si chiamava “Accordo tra il governo della Federazione Russa e il governo della Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria sulla cooperazione economica reciprocamente vantaggiosa e la preparazione delle condizioni per la conclusione di un trattato su vasta scala tra la Federazione Russa e la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria”. I due documenti, dagli altisonanti titoli, avrebbero dovuto essere la base giuridica sulla quale si sarebbero costruiti i rapporti tra Russia e Cecenia. Il “Trattato di Pace” iniziava con un epico preambolo riguardo la reciproca volontà di “[…] Porre fine al confronto secolare, cercando di stabilire relazioni forti, uguali e reciprocamente vantaggiose […]”. Un iniziò di tutto rispetto, dal quale ci si aspetterebbe un lungo ed articolato Trattato. E invece niente di questo. Il Documento si costituiva di cinque articoli, e soltanto tre contenevano qualcosa di politicamente rilevante. In essi Russia e Cecenia si impegnavano:

  • A rinunciare in modo permanente all’uso ed alla minaccia dell’uso della forza come forma di risoluzione di eventuali controversie;
  • A Costruire le loro relazioni conformemente ai principi ed alle norme generalmente riconosciuti dal diritto internazionale, e ad interagire in aree definite da accordi specifici;
  • A considerare il Trattato come base per la conclusione di qualsiasi altra negoziazione.

Di per sé le tre affermazioni possono essere considerate solide basi di negoziazione politica, ma a ben guardare si prestano a molteplici interpretazioni, come tutti gli altri “documenti”, “dichiarazioni” e “protocolli” firmati fino ad allora dalla marea di delegazioni che fin dal 1992 avevano cercato di trovare un accordo tra le parti. In particolare Maskhadov considerò il Trattato come il riconoscimento dell’Indipendenza cecena, dichiarando che la sua sottoscrizione apriva “Una nuova era politica per la Russia, il Caucaso e l’intero mondo musulmano”. Uno dei funzionari della politica estera cecena, delegato in Danimarca per conto della Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria, Usman Ferzauli, quando venne inviato da Maskhadov a firmare le Convenzioni di Ginevra, dichiarò: “[…] La Russia, firmando nel maggio 1997 il Trattato di Pace con la Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria di fatto ha riconosciuto la Repubblica. Abbiamo il diritto di considerarci un soggetto di diritto internazionale. […].”. Anche alcuni ricercatori internazionali, come Francis A. Boyle, professore presso il College Law dell’Università dell’Illinos, produssero ricerche giuridiche sul Trattato. Nella discussione di Boyle si legge: “L’elemento più importante del trattato è il suo titolo: “Trattato sulla pace e i principi delle interrelazioni tra la Federazione russa e l’Ichkeria della Repubblica cecena”

Maskhadov ed Eltsin si stringono la mano

IL PARERE FAVOREVOLE

Secondo i principi di base del diritto internazionale, un “trattato” è concluso tra due stati nazionali indipendenti. In altre parole, il CRI viene trattato dalla Federazione Russa come se fosse uno stato nazionale indipendente ai sensi del diritto e delle prassi internazionali. […] Allo stesso modo, l’uso del linguaggio “Trattato sui … principi di interrelazione” indica che la Russia sta trattando la CRI come uno stato nazionale indipendente anziché come un’unità componente della Federazione Russa. Normalmente, “i principi delle interrelazioni” tra uno stato federale come la Federazione Russa e un’unità componente sono determinati dalla Costituzione dello stato federale. Questo documento non dice nulla della Costituzione della Federazione Russa.  […]Certamente l’elemento più importante del titolo del Trattato è l’uso del termine “Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria”. Questo è il nome preciso che il popolo ceceno e il governo ceceno hanno deciso di dare al loro stato nazionale indipendente. In altre parole, ancora una volta, la Federazione Russa ha fornito ai Ceceni il riconoscimento di fatto (anche se non ancora di diritto) come stato nazionale indipendente alle loro condizioni. […] L’articolo 1 del trattato è sostanzialmente in linea con il requisito dell’articolo 2, paragrafo 4 della Carta delle Nazioni Unite secondo cui gli Stati membri “si astengono dalle loro relazioni internazionali dalla minaccia o dall’uso della forza ….” Allo stesso modo, la Carta delle Nazioni Unite Articolo 2, paragrafo 3, impone agli Stati membri di “risolvere le loro controversie internazionali con mezzi pacifici ….” Quindi, con questo Trattato, la Federazione Russa ha formalmente riconosciuto il suo obbligo di trattare la CRI in conformità con questi due requisiti fondamentali della Carta delle Nazioni Unite. […] Il secondo articolo dell’accordo è estremamente importante: “Costruire le nostre relazioni corrispondenti ai principi e alle norme generalmente accettati del diritto internazionale …” Secondo la mia opinione professionale, l’unico modo in cui l’articolo 2 del presente trattato può essere correttamente letto alla luce di tutto ciò che è stato detto in precedenza nel suo testo è che la Federazione russa sta trattando l’IRC come se fosse di fatto (anche se non ancora de jure) stato nazionale indipendente ai sensi del diritto e delle prassi internazionali, con una propria personalità giuridica internazionale. Solo gli stati nazionali indipendenti sono soggetti ai “principi e norme generalmente accettati del diritto internazionale”.  […].”

Accordi di Khasavyurt: Maskhadov e Lebed si stringono la mano

IL PARERE CONTRARIO

Il governo Russo negò questa interpretazione, considerando l’assenza di qualsiasi affermazione chiara in merito. Rispetto a questo, negli anni successivi sarebbe sorto un lungo dibattito, il che già di per sé dimostra quanto generici fossero gli impegni assunti dalle parti e quanto poco chiaro fosse il documento in se. In una sua trattazione del tema, il ricercatore russo Andrei Babitski scrisse:

“L’essenza di questo documento è semplice. E’ solo un documento sulla cessazione delle operazioni militari. […] Non menziona la capitolazione da parte di nessuna delle parti, non proclama nessuno vincitore e non formula principi chiari per governare le relazioni tra Russia e Cecenia. La risposta a queste domande è stata rinviata. La cosa più importante era terminare la guerra.”.

Silvia Serravo, ricercatrice esperta in questioni caucasiche, specificò in un’intervista:

“Il documento contiene la possibilità di interpretazioni diverse. […] L’indipendenza della Cecenia non è stata riconosciuta. Tuttavia, il documento ha reso possibile, almeno per la parte cecena, interpretarlo come il riconoscimento da parte della Russia dell’indipendenza cecena. […] Il trattato può certamente essere considerato un risultato. […] Tuttavia si può sempre speculare sulla misura in cui le parti erano sincere quando fu firmato questo documento e se la conclusione del Trattato si basava su alcuni motivi fraudolenti.”

INDIPENDENZA “SOSPESA”

Il secondo documento, collaterale al primo, conteneva un altra generica serie di intese difficilmente realizzabili. In esso si definiva l’attuazione dei contenuti degli Accordi di Khasavyurt in fatto di ripristino dei servizi vitali per la popolazione civile, il regolare pagamento delle pensioni e degli stupendi pubblici da parte della Federazione Russa,  il pagamento di un risarcimento alle vittime dei combattimenti, la “piena attuazione del programma di ripristino del complesso socioeconomico” del paese, il rilascio di ostaggi e prigionieri, e lo scioglimento della Commissione Governativa congiunta riguardo alla gestione del periodo interbellico, contemporaneamente all’entrata in vigore del Governo uscito dalle Elezioni del Gennaio precedente.

Se il primo documento, come abbiamo visto, poteva lasciar pensare che la Russia volesse trattare la Cecenia come uno Stato indipendente, il secondo assomigliava molto ad un accordo interfederale tra una repubblica autonoma bisognosa di aiuto ed un governo centrale che intendeva corrisponderglielo. Particolarmente evidente era l’impegno, da parte di Mosca, di erogare gli stipendi pubblici dell’amministrazione cecena. Questo passo è fondamentale, perchè accettandolo Maskhadov riconobbe implicitamente l’autorità di Mosca di mantenere la struttura amministrativa della Cecenia esattamente come faceva ai tempi dell’Unione Sovietica. Non un solo accenno era previsto riguardo al riconoscimento, anche formale, all’indipendenza del paese. Il Trattato di Pace firmato da Maskhadov fu un documento utile ad accreditare lui presso l’opinione pubblica ma fallì nel rappresentare uno strumento diplomatico utile a risolvere alcunchè. Certamente pose ufficialmente fine alla guerra e ad ogni palese ingerenza del governo federale sulla politica interna del paese, ma niente oltre a questo.

Il Trattato non riconobbe in maniera inequivocabile l’indipendenza del paese, ma si limitò a stabilire gli strumenti tramite i quali i due stati avrebbero comunicato tra loro. Dette ampia libertà di interpretazione sia al governo ceceno, che vide in quelle poche righe un implicito riconoscimento da parte di Mosca, che al governo russo, che ci riconobbe esclusivamente l’impegno assunto a riportare su binari politici il conflitto. Sul momento comunque sia Maskhadov che Eltsin poterono dirsi soddisfatti: il primo tornava in patria con un trattato di pace tra le mani, qualcosa che i Ceceni non avevano mai visto in tutta la loro storia. Il secondo tirava un sospiro di sollievo e metteva un temporaneo tampone a quella emorragia di consensi che era stata la Prima Guerra Cecena.

“Il mio principale nemico è Putin”. Intervista al comandante del battaglione ceceno in Ucraina, Muslim Cheberloevsky

Riportiamo di seguito un’intervista rilasciata il 7 Marzo 2022 da Umkhan Avtaev, nome di battaglia Muslim Cheberloevsky, comandante del Battaglione Sheikh Mansur, schierato in Ucraina dalla parte del governo di Kiev fin dal 2014. L’intervista è stata rilasciata a Kavkaz Realii, testata on line specializzata sull’attualità del Caucaso.

PREMESSA

In Ucraina si sta formando un nuovo distaccamento di ceceni, che resisterà all’aggressione militare russa. Le già esistenti formazioni di volontari armati intitolate allo sceicco Mansur e intitolate a Dzhokhar Dudayev hanno rilasciato dichiarazioni sulla loro partecipazione alla guerra a fianco dell’esercito ucraino. Ciò non poteva che suscitare l’indignazione del funzionario Grozny: il capo della Cecenia, Ramzan Kadyrov, ha chiesto ai volontari di deporre le armi, e ha anche promesso mezzo milione di dollari per i capi dei capi delle formazioni.

Il musulmano Cheberloevsky, comandante del battaglione Sheikh Mansur, in un’intervista a Kavkaz.Realii, ha detto chi è il suo nemico, perché non prende sul serio Kadyrov e perché non ci si dovrebbe fidare dei dati di Mosca sui funzionari della sicurezza ceceni uccisi durante la guerra.

– Ramzan Kadyrov promette 500mila dollari per la tua testa. Come hai reagito a questo?

– Lo sento dire per la prima volta, non ho tempo per ascoltare storie del genere. Manda qui questi ragazzi per essere massacrati, mentre lui stesso si siede e assegna qualche soldo per le loro teste. Diceva sempre di essere il fante di Putin, lo schiavo di Putin, il soldato di Putin e pronto ad andare in qualsiasi parte del mondo a combattere per Putin. Perciò non mandi qui questi ragazzi per essere trucidati, ma porti con sé i suoi cari, i signori (intende il presidente del parlamento ceceno Magomed Daudov, ndr ). E poi decideremo con lui cosa e perché.

Quante persone ci sono nella tua squadra? Chi sono questi combattenti?

“Quanti di noi, non posso dirlo. Ma il battaglione è stato creato nel 2014, quando c’era ancora quella guerra [nel Donbass]. Durante l’addestramento, la maggioranza era costituita da ceceni, ecco perché l’abbiamo chiamato così: “Battaglione ceceno intitolato allo sceicco Mansur“. Poi si aggiunsero persone provenienti da tutto il Caucaso: Ingusci, Daghestani, Cabardini, Balcari, Circassi, Azeri, Osseti. Ma non ce ne sono così tanti: da ogni nazione ci sono alcune persone o diverse dozzine, sono venute e sono andate. Ora molti hanno risposto da tutto il mondo, dall’Europa, molte persone si stanno arruolando. Pertanto, stiamo preparando nuovi gruppi. Sono pronti per incontrare Putin, Kadyrov, Hitler, Lukashenko… Chi altro c’è?

– A te, ceceno, musulmano: perché questa guerra?

– Se ce lo chiedi, non abbiamo bisogno di questa guerra per un solo minuto in nessuna parte del mondo. Questa guerra ci è stata imposta. La Repubblica Cecena di Ichkeria, come altre repubbliche che si sono separate dall’Unione Sovietica durante il crollo, ha dichiarato la propria indipendenza e sovranità. Da quel momento, abbiamo problemi con la Russia. Nel 1991-92 iniziarono sabotaggi, gli attentati, le esplosioni. E da allora sono stato coinvolto in tutto questo. Nel 1994, ufficialmente, la Russia, avendo perso la speranza in questi oppositori filo-russi in Cecenia, che erano stati riforniti e opposti alla nostra leadership, ci ha attaccata l’11 dicembre 1994. È passato molto tempo, ma la guerra continua.

Abbiamo vinto la prima guerra, il mondo intero lo sa. Con la seconda guerra, nel 1999, hanno tenuto conto dei loro errori, delle loro carenze, della coesione del popolo ceceno … Sebbene siano stati firmati accordi diversi, hanno firmato l’indipendenza l’uno dell’altro. Siamo stati costretti a lasciare la Cecenia per vari motivi. Abbiamo perso quattro presidenti! L’intero stato maggiore, i sopravvissuti, hanno lasciato la Cecenia. Alcuni sono tornati.

E quando è scoppiata la guerra in Ucraina nel 2014, abbiamo deciso di partecipare al fianco dell’Ucraina e battere il nostro nemico comune.

– Dopo il conflitto del 2014, qualche anno dopo, le persone che erano nella tua rosa hanno iniziato ad avere problemi. Sono stati inseriti negli elenchi delle sanzioni . Ci sono garanzie per loro dall’Ucraina ora?

– No. Stiamo ora cercando di elaborare una sorta di accordo in modo che tutto ciò sia legale. In modo che non ci siano domande. Sappiamo perché quelle situazioni si sono genere.

Miliziano del Battaglione Sheikh Mansur con un’arma anticarro sul fronte orientale (2022)

– Per cosa?

Putin stava pianificando un attacco a Kiev e al resto dell’Ucraina. Pertanto, quando è stata annunciata una tregua a Minsk nel 2016-17, gli accordi, per tutto questo tempo si stavano preparando per un grande attacco. Anche se abbiamo detto ai nostri militari e al Servizio di sicurezza dell’Ucraina: non finirà così, si sono presi una pausa per i preparativi, l’abbiamo vissuto sul nostro territorio, nelle nostre guerre, non potete crederci per un secondo, dovete prepararvi.

Tutto questo è stato ignorato dal servizio di sicurezza dell’Ucraina: dissero: “lo sappiamo, stiamo verificando” ma non c’era una preparazione specifica. E loro, oltre ai preparativi, volevano ripulire l’Ucraina dall’interno da noi, in modo che non aiutassimo, in modo che i volontari non si unissero a noi. Hanno corrotto qualcuno in alcuni livelli della SBU o della polizia. Volevano sbarazzarsi di noi con le loro mani. Sappiamo che ci sono molti soldi in mezzo. A loro è stato affidato il compito: accusare queste persone di quello che vogliono ed espellerle. Nel 2018-20, i servizi speciali ucraini hanno consegnato due dei nostri combattenti alla Russia. Si aspettavano che se avessero cominciato a tradirci, il resto sarebbe scappato, se ne sarebbe andato, si sarebbe offeso. C’era una scommessa su questo.

Ma non siamo scappati, rendendoci conto che si trattava di un’operazione speciale dell’FSB, abbiamo cercato di spiegarlo agli ufficiali della SBU e siamo rimasti qui. Abbiamo detto: “Se siamo colpevoli, dimostrateci la nostra colpa”. Non hanno dimostrato, non c’erano prove. Quando hanno iniziato a cercare chi ci metteva in queste liste, non riuscivano a trovarne le generalità. Gli ufficiali della SBU dicevano: “Non vi abbiamo messo noi in queste liste”. La polizia, la guardia di frontiera, il servizio di immigrazione dicevano la stessa cosa. Questo processo è andato avanti negli ultimi sei mesi e non è stata trovata l’ultima risorsa, ma sappiamo che questo è il lavoro dell’FSB e di Kadyrov. Rendendoci conto di questo, non siamo andati da nessuna parte. Ci è stato detto: “Andate in Turchia, in Europa, non vi impediamo di farlo”. Non siamo andati da nessuna parte, siamo rimasti, sapendo che stavano arrivando i guai. Ora siamo pronti a difenderci insieme agli ucraini. A difendere l’Ucraina, Kiev.

– Chi sono i tuoi nemici? Russia, russi, Kadyrov, Putin?

– A questo punto per me il principale nemico è Putin, il suo regime e il suo entourage. Chi è Kadyrov? Voi giornalisti avete gonfiato l’importanza di Kadyrov, come se fosse una persona indipendente! Kadyrov è lo schiavo di Putin. Certo, ci offendiamo quando dicono: i ceceni hanno attaccato l’Ucraina, i ceceni ci hanno invasi. I ceceni non hanno invaso e non hanno attaccato. Mai nella storia i ceceni hanno avuto inimicizia con l’Ucraina. E non l’avranno neanche adesso. Questi sono bastardi che si definiscono ceceni… E noi, ceceni purosangue, siamo un po’ offesi. La Cecenia, che ha combattuto con la Russia in due guerre, ha perso 300mila abitanti su un milione! Altre 300.000 persone sono sfollate e vivono fuori dalla Cecenia. Questi sono i ceceni che possono definirsi veri ceceni. E questi bastardi sono gli scagnozzi di Putin.

Se Kadyrov può definirsi ceceno, perché si trova nel territorio della Cecenia, che è più piccolo della regione di Lugansk, sorvegliato da 100.000 soldati russi? Senza di loro, non è nessuno. La sua gente comune che è tenuta in ostaggio sul territorio della Cecenia lo sputerebbe semplicemente e lo ucciderebbe se ci fosse un’opportunità e il libero arbitrio. Ma davanti a Kadyrov c’è un esercito russo di centomila uomini. Sta dietro di loro, si nasconde e dice che è ceceno e sta restaurando la repubblica.

– Perché gli uomini di Kadyrov ora appaiono ovunque?

– Perché nel 2008, quando la Russia ha attaccato la Georgia, la 56a armata è poi entrata a Tskhinvali, i georgiani hanno reagito, non li hanno lasciati entrare, hanno combattuto. Quindi i Kadyroviti furono ammessi lì, il battaglione Vostok, prese Tskhinvali. Da quel momento furono addestrati come cani da combattimento.

– Ma “Vostok” allora era degli Yamadaev .

– Sì. Che importa? Era a capo del battaglione, ma era anche un kadyrovita, l’uomo di Putin. Con l’aiuto degli Yamadayev e di altri, i Kadyroviti salirono al potere, si rafforzarono e in seguito li uccisero loro stessi . È importante. Gli Yamadayev furono usati. La famiglia Kadyrov non ha avuto tali opportunità e gli Yamadayev hanno combattuto la prima guerra dalla nostra parte. C’erano cinque o sei fratelli, erano molto coraggiosi.

[…] Erano pochi, 200-300 persone. Sono stati colpiti, hanno perso l’appetito e sono stati ritirati. Ma non per ritirarsi completamente dall’Ucraina, ma per prepararsi meglio. Sono stati inviati in Siria, dove si svolgevano i combattimenti. Sono stati addestrati, preparati per essere gettati qui. La scommessa principale di Putin era su di loro: sarebbero arrivati ​​i Kadyroviti, tutti si sarebbero dati alla fuga e avrebbero portato tutto in movimento. Quello che sta succedendo oggi, lo vediamo. Sono portati come polli in questi campi. Non si arrendono e ne lanciano sempre di nuovi. E non ci sono solo ceceni. Hanno reclutato da tutto il Caucaso, hanno portato tutti qui sotto il marchio dei Kadyroviti.

Perché Putin ha permesso l’illegalità della gente di Kadyrov in tutta la Russia? Vengono in qualsiasi città: qualsiasi sindaco, deputato si scusa con loro. [….

– Come hai reagito all’informazione che un altro, già il terzo battaglione di volontari, che includerà euro-Ichkeriani , si sta formando vicino a Leopoli?

– Prendiamo con noi persone che conosciamo personalmente o persone di cui ci fidiamo al 100%. Non prendiamo nessun’altro. Pertanto, abbiamo semplicemente rifiutato e rifiutiamo molti. Questo è probabilmente il motivo per cui coloro che volevano unirsi a noi si sono rivolti da qualche altra parte. In ogni caso non interferisce. Che ci sia un’altra squadra. Più è meglio è, sarà solo più facile per noi.

– Akhmed Zakaev, il primo ministro di Ichkeria in esilio , ha chiesto di unirsi a tali distaccamenti. Sei in contatto con loro?

– Comunichiamo su alcuni problemi per telefono. Sì, ha invitato i volontari a unirsi ai distaccamenti, lo abbiamo sostenuto, siamo pienamente d’accordo con questo. L’unico punto: correre da qualche parte è una cosa, ma devi concludere una sorta di accordo in modo che dopo non ci siano problemi.

Nel 2014 siamo arrivati ​​frettolosamente, tutto era verbale, non c’erano documenti. Quelli che ci hanno chiamato qui per chiedere aiuto – i servizi segreti, si potrebbe dire, quelli ucraini – che si sono licenziati, che sono stati trasferiti. Senza documenti ufficiali, abbiamo una situazione del genere. Per evitare che ciò accada di nuovo, stiamo cercando di elaborare questo momento – in modo che tutto sia conforme alla legge, in modo che ci sia ordine. In modo che alcune persone incomprensibili sotto questo marchio non arrivino qui. Per potersi fidare l’uno dell’altro.

Al raduno "Ichkeria è viva!"  a Kiev, Piazza Indipendenza, 13 agosto 2017.  Nella foto - un membro di uno dei battaglioni ceceni con le strisce delle bandiere di Ichkeria e Ucraina
Al raduno “Ichkeria è viva!” a Kiev, Piazza Indipendenza, 13 agosto 2017. Nella foto – un membro di uno dei battaglioni ceceni con le strisce delle bandiere di Ichkeria e Ucraina

– Hai informazioni sul numero di ceceni morti nell’esercito russo?

– Non abbiamo informazioni specifiche, ma quello che dicono ufficialmente in Cecenia sul numero delle persone uccise non ha senso. Centinaia di loro sono stati mandati qui. Sono nascosti in Bielorussia, negli obitori , non vengono mandati a casa. Ecco perché diciamo a Kadyrov: se vuoi farla finita con noi o qualcun altro, vieni qui tu stesso. Costi a nascondi lì, codardo? Stai mandando questi ragazzi al macello.

– Ha detto che aveva 70mila persone pronte a partire in qualsiasi momento, in qualsiasi parte del mondo, se necessario.

– Bene! Che raccolga questi 70mila, ma che vada lui stesso in testa. Mandarli tutti qui e restare tu stesso a casa: questo può essere solo opera dell’ultimo dei codardi. Non mando i miei combattenti da qualche parte. Sono in trincea con loro! Mangio quello che mangiano loro, dormo dove dormono loro. Esco con loro in ricognizione, non li mando da soli, anche se sono molto più giovani e veloci, è difficile per me stare al passo con loro, ma comunque lo faccio. Non posso sedermi a casa, mandare le persone da qualche parte, poi aspettare chi di loro tornerà e chi no. E questo ateo sta seduto a casa, manda queste persone. Glielo dico personalmente: è un codardo, perché sta a casa e non viene qui, ma manda questi ragazzi. Se è un devoto fanti di Putin, allora lascia che tutti i 70mila suoi e 100mila soldati russi prendano e vadano qui. Siamo qui! Lo stiamo aspettando, siamo a posto, non siamo scappati, non ci siamo ritirati.

– In alcuni articoli scrivono di te che ripaghi l’Ucraina per il fatto che gli ucraini hanno difeso l’indipendenza di Ichkeria. C’erano molti di questi ucraini?

Non ho alcun debito con nessuno. Non l’ho detto da nessuna parte, e non lo farò. Gli ucraini sono venuti di loro spontanea volontà in Cecenia nel 1994 e hanno aiutato in ogni modo possibile. Quando il compianto Sashko Bely ( Alexander Muzychko – guidò il distaccamento ucraino filo-Ichkeriano durante la guerra in Cecenia), da qualche parte su Internet dovrebbe esserci questo video era in Cecenia con il suo distacco, quindi gli è stata posta la domanda: “I ceceni sono musulmani, voi siete cristiani. Cosa vi lega? Perché siete venuti ad aiutare i ceceni?” Ha risposto: “Siamo venuti qui perché se la guerra in Cecenia non fosse iniziata, i russi avrebbero attaccato l’Ucraina. Con questa guerra, la Cecenia ha salvato l’Ucraina, ha ritardato la guerra su se stessa, siamo obbligati ad aiutare”. Questo è quello che hanno detto nel 1994-95.

Quando tutto questo è iniziato qui, non siamo venuti qui sotto le bandiere di Zelensky o Poroshenko, non per sostenere qualche presidente o partito. Siamo venuti qui per aiutare il popolo ucraino, in modo che l’Ucraina non cadesse sotto l’influenza della Russia e fosse indipendente. Oggi qui si decide una svolta molto importante. Se l’Ucraina cade, cadranno tutte le repubbliche dell’ex URSS. I paesi indipendenti intorno alla Russia perderanno la loro possibilità di libertà. Oggi, se l’Ucraina sopravvive, questa è un’opportunità per tutti. Comprendendo tutto questo, guardiamo oltre e vediamo oltre. Non siamo mai stati nemici e non credo che lo saremo in futuro. Speriamo di spezzare la schiena a questo regime del Cremlino. E questo inizierà la liberazione del nostro Caucaso e di tutto il popolo oppresso dalla Russia!

Le parole di Dudaev sull’Ucraina

Nel 1995, durante la Prima Guerra Cecena, Dzhokhar Dudaev rilasciò un’intervista (della quale alleghiamo il link) che, alla luce degli eventi in corso in Ucraina, potremmo definire profetica. Parlando degli appetiti imperiali di Mosca, da lui definiti “Russismo”, Previde uno scontro “mortale” tra Russia e Ucraina. Ne riproponiamo oggi una traduzione in Inglese, a cura di Inna Kurochkina, e la sua trascrizione in italiano.

Of course, Russia’s plans and appetites have been always wide. But they stopped in Afghanistan.

You know, as in a joke: An Ant goes bandaged, and a mosquito asks. “What’s the matter with you, Murik, dear? What happened?” – “Yes … There was a case … I wanted to taste a firefly, but I ran into a cigarette butt.”

That’s how they ran into Afghanistan. And their appetite has waned a bit. And when they failed in Afghanistan, they decided to change their policy, to win Europe over to their side, ideologists and politicians. And Russia started to flirt with Europe. To intensify their influence up to the Indian Ocean, the Middle East, the Bosphorus, the Red Sea, and then slap Europe as well. Then Afghanistan, and then other difficulties, and now also Ichkeria. Ichkeria reduced Russia’s appetite a little, but did not stop.

There will still be a massacre in Crimea. Ukraine will still clash with Russia…deadly…  As long as “Rusism” exists, it will never give up its ambitions. Right now, “Slavic” plan is there … under this brand, they want to crush Ukraine and Belarus again, as in the old days. Russia wants to get stronger. Now no one wants to be with Russia and in an alliance, either in the military… not only in the military… in the economic, and in the political, and even in the trade sense.

Because they have studied well.

TRADUZIONE ITALIANA

Ovviamente, i piani e gli appetiti russi sono sempre stati voraci. Ma furono frustrati in Afghanistan.

Sai, come in quella barzelletta: una formica si aggira, tutta bendata, ed una zanzara gli chiede: “Che ti succede, Murik Caro? Cosa è successo?” – “Si, è successa una cosa…volevo assaggiare una lucciola, ma sono finito addosso ad un mozzicone di sigaretta”

E’ così che finirono in Afghanistan. E il loro appetito fu ridotto un po’. A quando fallirono in Afghanistan, decisero di cambiare la loro politica, per battere l’Europa sul suo terreno, ideologico e politico. E la Russia iniziò a flirtare con l’Europa, per intensificare la sua influenza nell’Oceano Indiano, nel Medio Oriente, nel Bosforo, nel Mar Rosso, per poi prendere a schiaffi per bene l’Europa. Poi l’Afghanistan, e ancora altre difficoltà, e ora anche l’Ichkeria. l’Ichkeria ha ridotto un po’ gli appetiti russi, ma non li ha fermati.

Ci sarà ancora un massacro in Crimea. L’Ucraina si scontrerà nuovamente contro la Russia, mortalmente…finchè esisterà il Russismo, questo non rinuncerà mai alle sue ambizioni. In questo momento, il piano “Slavo” è lì…sotto questo marchio, vogliono schiacciare un’altra volta Ucraina e Bielorussia, come ai vecchi tempi. La Russia vuole diventare più forte. Adesso nessuno vuole stare in un’alleanza con la Russia, nè militare, nè economica, nè politica, nè commerciale.

Perchè hanno studiato bene.